Archive for the ‘Internet Identity Theft’ Category

St. Johns County woman wanted for identity theft; had personal info …

Wednesday, December 13th, 2017

Article source: http://www.firstcoastnews.com/news/local/st-johns-county-woman-wanted-for-identity-theft-has-personal-info-of-at-least-147-people/498851971

Technorati Tags: ,

St. Johns County woman wanted for identity theft; had personal info of at least 147 people

Wednesday, December 13th, 2017

Article source: http://www.firstcoastnews.com/news/local/st-johns-county-woman-wanted-for-identity-theft-has-personal-info-of-at-least-147-people/498851971

Technorati Tags: ,

Northwest residents fret about identity theft, but many are slow to reduce risks

Wednesday, December 13th, 2017

 

Article source: http://www.nwnews.com/index.php/news-features/news-2/15619-northwest-residents-fret-about-identity-theft-but-many-are-slow-to-reduce-risks

Technorati Tags: ,

3 Things You Can do to Protect Yourself From Identity Theft

Wednesday, December 13th, 2017

HOPEWELL JUNCTION, NY –   “2016 will be remembered as a banner year for fraudsters”, is the way the Javelin Strategy Research report and study on Identity Theft begins.

Despite years of battling by the financial industry and a massive change in the way Americans use debit and credit cards, the rate of identity theft soared during 2016 and hit an all-time high.

An estimated 15.4 million consumers were hit with some kind of ID theft last year, according to Javelin Strategy Research, up from 13.1 million the year before.

 Fraud losses totaled $16 billion, the report found.

About 1 in every 16 U.S. adults were victims of ID theft last year (6.15%) — and the incidence rate jumped some 16% year over year. This despite 2016 being the first full year that brick-and-mortar retailers were forced to accept more secure EMV chip cards or face liability consequences.

Even theft involving cell phone account takeovers — which help criminals gain access to financial accounts when consumers utilize two-factor authentication involving a text message or token app — has doubled in the past year.

Manning offers simple tips that could make a big difference.  “Keep your credit card in eye sight when making a purchase”, he warns.  “Don’t let the clerk go to a back room or another portion of the counter if you can’t see what they are doing.”

For on line purchases, Manning suggests ensuring that the website is secured.  A simple way to check this is to ascertain that the URL includes the “s” in the http:// portion of the navigation bar.

Manning also suggests registering with a fraud protection agency so that if you’re personal information has been compromised, the agency can restore your information as quickly as possible.   “Once you’ve been compromised, getting all of your data back to normal could take up to 600 business hours.  An ID theft agency can help you through that”, noted Manning.

For more information regarding ID theft and prevention check out any of the following websites.

ID Shield

Identity Guard

Identity Armor

Article source: http://hudsonvalleynewsnetwork.com/2017/12/12/3-things-can-protect-identity-theft/

Technorati Tags: ,

5 tips to prevent identity theft this holiday season

Tuesday, December 12th, 2017

Identity theft is a real threat and it can be damaging to your finances and personal life. Make sure you’re doing all you can to keep yourself safe during this holiday season. Here are 5 things you can do to stay protected.

Secure your passwords: Stop using the word ‘password’ as your password. People actually do this. And don’t use your mother’s maiden name. It’s time to get sneaky. Create a complex password that only you can remember. For instance, maybe you’re a big Yankees fan. Design a passphrase like, “I think the Yankees will win the World Series in 2018! Then use the initials, symbols, and numbers from that phrase to create your password. That would look like this: IttYwwtWSi2018! Nobody’s going to guess that one. According to howsecureismypassword.net, it would take a computer 16 billion years to crack that password.

Shred sensitive information: Your weekly routine probably involves dragging your trash can out to the street on trash day. Make sure when this happens, you’re not throwing anything away that an identity thief could find valuable. Anything that contains account numbers, banking information, or social security numbers would be gold for a thief. Get online, buy a paper shredder and put it to work. This is the easiest way to help yourself stay protected.

Check your credit report: If checking your credit report isn’t something you do regularly, you should make it one. If a thief opens up an account in your name, this will affect your credit score and that can be an easy red flag to detect. Although it used to be a hassle, there are a few sites that provide free credit reports these days. If you need a suggestion, check out Credit Karma. I’ve been using this service for a while and I’ve been super pleased.

Be careful with the internet: Cybercriminals can get your information a few ways, one of which is phishing. Phishing is when a cybercriminal defrauds you of sensitive information by posing as a legitimate company that you trust. Make sure you never click a link in an email that’s asking you for personal information. You’ll never get an email like this if you didn’t request it, and even then, contact the company and have it verified. Also, make sure you’re not doing sensitive things like logging into your bank website from a coffee house’s Wi-Fi.

Monitor your accounts: My online banking got hacked once. Fortunately, because I login quite often, I noticed a pending transaction that I wasn’t aware of. Because I caught it in the pending phase, I was able to cancel it and save myself the headache of having to get my money back. I still closed the account and opened a new one, but it showed me the importance of regularly looking at my accounts and keeping a close eye on my money.

 

Article source: https://www.cuinsight.com/5-tips-prevent-identity-theft-holiday-season.html

Technorati Tags: ,

Northwood woman charged with identity theft, forgery

Tuesday, December 12th, 2017

Whenever Courtney Fiorini posts new content, you’ll get an email delivered to your inbox with a link.

Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

Article source: http://globegazette.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/northwood-woman-charged-with-identity-theft-forgery/article_cc0dc757-9223-591e-9925-4cc7d35f4491.html

Technorati Tags: ,

Albany woman charged with identity theft

Tuesday, December 12th, 2017

Caption

Close


An Albany woman was arrested on Friday for allegedly using a stolen SEFCU debit card.

State Police charged Diamond S. Moultrie, 20, with felony identity theft and criminal possession of stolen property. She was also charged with several misdemeanors.

Investigators said Moultrie withdrew cash from an ATM in Colonie and then used the card to make several purchases at Crossgates Mall in Guilderland.


She was arraigned in Colonie town court and sent to Albany County jail on two $5,000 bails.

Article source: http://www.timesunion.com/news/article/Albany-woman-charged-with-identity-theft-12421478.php

Technorati Tags: ,

Protecting your personal information from identity theft

Tuesday, December 12th, 2017

As the holiday season approaches, it becomes increasingly important for consumers to exercise caution to protect financial information.

Doing so can keep a cheerful time of year from turning into a financial nightmare.

Sensitive information can be obtained improperly in various ways, most often through scams involving unsolicited phone calls or emails, online shopping and hacking.

Scammers can use information — including full names, addresses, Social Security numbers, birthdates, driver’s license numbers, bank account numbers and credit card numbers — to wreak financial havoc.

Consumers should be wary if someone calls and asks for personal information. Often, the caller will impersonate someone from a financial institution or government agency and tell the consumer they owe money. Scammers will also sometimes strike through emails requesting personal information by pretending to be someone they are not.

Online shopping offers convenience, but may also open the door for those who would steal personal information. Disreputable sites may offer goods at prices that are too good to be true, but could end up costing shoppers much more if their financial information is stolen.

Especially around the holidays, phishing scams often appear in the form of online coupons. Clicking the link on a digital coupon may redirect users to another, non-secure site.

In September, we learned of a massive data breach affecting an estimated 145.5 million consumers. It took place when hackers obtained sensitive information by targeting Equifax, one of the nation’s three major credit bureau monitoring agencies. More than 730,000 West Virginians were potentially impacted by the breach.

The action of my office and those of other state attorneys general led to an extended deadline to enroll for free credit reports and identity theft protection offered by Equifax. We’re also very involved in other matters pertaining to the Equifax breach, but the chance that hackers may now possess sensitive data increases the threat of identity theft for those impacted.

In the wake of this event — and in other instances when identity theft could happen — it is more important than ever for consumers to be aware of the risks and protect their information from those who wish to use it unlawfully.

Consumer protection must begin with the individual.

There are many warning signs to alert consumers of potential identity theft. Unexplained withdrawals from bank accounts, unfamiliar accounts or charges on credit reports and receiving bills from medical providers for services a consumer didn’t use can all indicate that personal identifiable information has been compromised.

Consumers also should carefully review their account statements. This can aid in spotting potential identity theft. Any transactions not initiated by the account holder should be reported to the financial institution as quickly as possible. Once a loss or unauthorized use of an ATM or debit card is reported, federal law dictates consumers cannot be held liable for unofficial transfers of more than $50 thereafter.

Closely monitoring credit reports is another way to discover identity theft.

Online shoppers also should use reputable websites and look for “https” at checkout as the “s” denotes a secure connection.

Don’t sacrifice security for a good deal.

Through consumer education and careful guarding of personal financial information, holiday shopping can be a safe and enjoyable activity.

(Patrick Morrisey is the Attorney General of West Virginia.)

Article source: http://www.fayettetribune.com/opinion/protecting-your-personal-information-from-identity-theft/article_4575991e-de2f-11e7-ac57-3fc737d0001b.html

Technorati Tags: ,

Albany woman charged with identity theft – Times Union

Tuesday, December 12th, 2017

Caption

Close


An Albany woman was arrested on Friday for allegedly using a stolen SEFCU debit card.

State Police charged Diamond S. Moultrie, 20, with felony identity theft and criminal possession of stolen property. She was also charged with several misdemeanors.

Investigators said Moultrie withdrew cash from an ATM in Colonie and then used the card to make several purchases at Crossgates Mall in Guilderland.


She was arraigned in Colonie town court and sent to Albany County jail on two $5,000 bails.

Article source: http://www.timesunion.com/news/article/Albany-woman-charged-with-identity-theft-12421478.php

Technorati Tags: ,

Five Safety Tips To Avoid Online Identity Theft

Tuesday, December 12th, 2017

Post written by

Mark Bauman

Article source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesagencycouncil/2017/12/11/five-safety-tips-to-avoid-online-identity-theft/

Technorati Tags: ,