Archive for the ‘Internet Identity Theft’ Category

Threat of identity theft played a role in record Anthem settlement

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017

Anthem is on the cusp of having to make the biggest payout in U.S. history for a data breach. The $115 million proposed settlement reflects just how valuable patient records and personal information have become.

“There’ve been bigger breaches, such as Target, but this one is unique because of the types of the records taken,” said Daniel Marvin, a partner with law firm Morrison Mahoney who specializes in data security and cyber-insurance topics. Almost 80 million records were exposed in the 2015 breach, revealing names, birth dates, Social Security numbers and other information. “The critical and valuable information that most lends itself to identity theft is the type of information that was taken,” he explained. “That’s one of the reasons we’re seeing such a large number in terms of the settlement amount.”

Target and Home Depot, two companies that suffered well-documented data breaches of their own during the past couple of years, each paid less than a fifth of what Anthem is expected to dole out to settle their claims. The Anthem settlement must still be approved by the U.S. District Court in California.

“When comparing the Anthem number to other large retail breaches, keep in mind that in most of those retail breaches it was just credit card information,” said Kenneth Dort, a partner at Drinker Biddle Reath, a law firm whose clients include Anthem, but was not involved in this settlement. “There isn’t a high level of identity fraud, whereas with Anthem, you’ve got a pretty good foundation for potential identity theft.”

Still, the Anthem settlement may not capture all the company’s total exposure related to the breach, Marvin said. There’s the initial forensic analysis, notification of the people whose information was breached, and possible reputational damage.

Healthcare companies should take notice.

“It’s not just insurers,” said David Holtzman, vice president of compliance strategies for CynergisTek and a former senior adviser to HHS’ Office for Civil Rights. “It’s vital that everyone, from the smallest physicians office to the largest health insurer, have some cyber-awareness in place and take appropriate measures to understand what the risk is.”

He pointed to the fact that the Anthem breach happened because an employee opened a phishing email and that it took almost an entire year for Anthem to notice anything was awry. “The big takeaway from this breach,” Holtzman said, “is you have to have technologies in place that allow for audit and review, for monitoring system activity.”

Article source: http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20170626/NEWS/170629915

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Identity theft a growing issue

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017

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Article source: http://www.dothaneagle.com/enterprise_ledger/news/identity-theft-a-growing-issue/article_2fdff20a-5a83-11e7-9de8-efca300ff717.html

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I was a victim of identity theft

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017

Q-C Online: Moline and Rock Island, Illinois
My Web Times: Ottawa and Streator, Illinois
Post Bulletin: Rochester, Minnesota

Article source: http://www.daily-journal.com/news/local/i-was-a-victim-of-identity-theft/article_c15b9e8b-edaf-5ec3-a8fd-b717de8f20a6.html

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Longmont police notes: Identity theft – Longmont Times

Monday, June 26th, 2017

Longmont police took a report of identity theft on the 200 block of Alpine Street Friday. A man was identified as a possible suspect and the case is open.

Vandalism on the 2200 block of Main Street was reported to police Friday. No suspects were identified.

A license plate was stolen by an unknown person from a Longmont resident’s motorhome Friday at 2500 Falcon Drive.

Vandalism was reported on the 200 block of Cardinal Way Friday.

A man was arrested after police responded to a domestic incident at 4 p.m. Friday on 23rd Avenue and Francis Street.

Longmont police investigated a case of sexual assault 6 p.m. Friday on the 2000 block of Sunset Way. A 25-year-old man is suspected and the case is open.

A man reported that a family member struck his vehicle on purpose following a disturbance on Friday. The man did not want a criminal investigation.

A possible domestic incident was reported to police Friday on the 300 block of Quail Road.

Article source: http://www.timescall.com/longmont-local-news/ci_31090813/longmont-police-notes-identity-theft

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Kiplinger’s Personal Finance: How can I prevent identity theft when I’m traveling?

Sunday, June 25th, 2017

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Article source: http://www.richmond.com/business/personal-finance/kiplinger-s-personal-finance-how-can-i-prevent-identity-theft/article_b7d39c77-9bbc-5790-8324-fdcc71ca59ef.html

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Apparent identity theft victim needed help after getting bogus Verizon bill

Saturday, June 24th, 2017

Q-C Online: Moline and Rock Island, Illinois
My Web Times: Ottawa and Streator, Illinois
Post Bulletin: Rochester, Minnesota

Article source: http://www.daily-journal.com/news/local/apparent-identity-theft-victim-needed-help-after-getting-bogus-verizon/article_845000ce-18d5-58b6-b704-bf3dc39d1865.html

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New Medicare Card to Protect Against Identity Theft

Saturday, June 24th, 2017

  New Medicare cards that do not include social security numbers are being phased in to help prevent identity theft. Frank Frassetto, the administrator for the Division of Trade and Consumer Protection, says the new cards will be sent in the mail and the change will be automatic. He says no action will be required by the cardholder and says instead of a social security number, the card will include a Medicare Beneficiary Identifier that will be used for billing and checking eligibility and claim status.

 

“Any time people are carrying their Medicare card around currently if it has a social security number on it and then if it is lost or stolen, crooks can use that information to steal someone’s identity. So then nice thing about this is it’s not going to have you social security number on it.”

 

However, Frassetto warns identity thieves will still find ways to scam people. He says people should be aware of the most common methods….

 

“First of all, if someone is claiming to be from Medicare and asking for your Social Security number and bank information, hang up. It’s a scam. Also, if someone is asking you to pay for this new card during this process, that’s also a scam. The Medicare card is free. And then if someone is threatening to cancel your benefits if you don’t give up your money or your information, that is definitely a scam.”

 

Frassetto says to protect yourself from scammers, be sure to guard identifying information, shred sensitive documents, watch bills and bank statements for suspicious activity, and sign up for the Do Not Call list. Visit medicare.gov for more information.

 

 

Article source: http://wxpr.org/post/new-medicare-card-protect-against-identity-theft

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Protect your children from being victims of identity theft

Saturday, June 24th, 2017

We are constantly trying to protect our children — “don’t put that in your mouth,” “look both ways before crossing,” “don’t run with scissors.”

But what about protecting your child’s identity? It may not be something we think about too often, but it is important to keep in mind, especially with the amount of identity theft scams that occur each year. BBB Scam Tracker has received nearly 600 identity theft scams just this year alone.

It’s important to pay attention to situations that may put your child’s information and identity at risk. Who has access to his or her information? Has there been a recent data breach? Pay special attention to notices from your child’s school or organizations they participate in.

The Identity Theft Resource Center says child identity theft can be discovered in several cases:

▪  When attempting to open a savings account or college fund for the child. In this scenario, an unoffending parent discovers there is already an account with that SSN or that the new account is denied due to a bad check record;

▪  When numerous credit cards, checks, pre-approved credit card offers, bills or bank statements are received in the name of the child;

▪  When collection agencies call or send letters about accounts not opened by the child;

▪  When a teen is denied the right to get a driver’s license because another person has a license with that SSN as ID. The imposter may even have accumulated tickets or citations in the child’s name;

▪  While going through papers during a divorce or while straightening up the house (parental identity theft).

If you see activity that doesn’t match up, visit identitytheft.gov to begin the recovery process. If you suspect your child’s identity has been stolen, contact the three credit reporting agencies and ask for a manual search. You may be asked to provide his or her birth certificate, Social Security card, your proof of identity and/or proof of address. Consider placing a freeze on credit until it’s needed.

Identity theft can happen to anyone, at any age. Limit the risk by taking these steps:

Protect information: File all paper and electronic records in a safe and secure location.

Don’t share if you don’t have to: Inquire if the information being asked is required. Ask if you can use a different identifiable number, other than your child’s Social Security Number.

Ask how your information will be protected: Find out how sensitive information at your child’s school or doctor’s office will be secured.

Destroy safely: Shred all documents that contain your child’s personal information.

Keeping an eye on your child’s identity, and taking steps to protect it, will help set them up for the future when they are ready to start applying for jobs, car loans, student loans and a place to rent. So, while you’re busy getting gum out of your daughter’s hair or checking for monsters under the bed, you may as well add “Super Child Identity Protector” to your parenting repertoire.

Article source: http://www.idahostatesman.com/news/business/biz-columns-blogs/article157983079.html

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Scam alert: Hackers using airline name for identity theft

Saturday, June 24th, 2017

  • A new scam uses Delta Airlines to steal personal information.gt;gt;Click to see where Delta and other airlines offer nonstop flights from Houston. Photo: ROBYN BECK, AFP/Getty Images

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TURKS AND CAICOS
United offers Saturday flights
this summer.
Flight time: Just under 4 hours.     

TURKS AND CAICOS
United offers Saturday flights this summer.
Flight time: Just under 4 hours.     


Photo: ROBERT CROSS:, McCLATCHY TRIBUNE


Scammers are taking advantage of the travel season being in full swing. 

An email is circulating that looks like it’s from Delta Airlines. It’s a travel reminder for an upcoming flight with travel details. 

See the gallery above to check out where you can fly internationally without a layover.

A link in the email takes you directly to a site infested with Malware that’s used to steal peoples’ personal information. 


CAREFUL: Montgomery County deputies warn about scam

“It’s looking for email information, login information, VPN information, banking info, app info. The list is endless.” CyberScout founder Adam Levin told KTRK. 



(Story continues below … )

One way to spot the phishing scam message? The sender is DeltaA or Delta A, but it should read: “Delta.com.” 

Additionally, some travelers know that itinerary emails from airlines typically show all of the flight details in the body of the email. This email requires you to click into a link. 

This particular scam seems to resurface during busy travel seasons. It’s been reported on in past summers and again earlier this year, when many families were planning spring break trips.

Article source: http://www.chron.com/news/nation-world/article/Scam-alert-hackers-delta-airlines-identity-theft-11241745.php

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What should one do in the case of identity theft?

Saturday, June 24th, 2017

Identity thieves stole $16 billion from 15 million Americans in 2016, according to the Insurance Information Institute. That is an average loss of approximately $1,000 to each bilked customer.

Learning that your identity may have been stolen is scary, a reader reports. She is usually very careful, but found herself at risk of identity theft after she received an email that her online accounts had been locked, but she could unlock them by answering a few questions. The questions asked for personal information, she answered, and by the time she realized that something was wrong with the situation, she had provided enough information to put herself at risk from the scammers.

She wants to know how to figure out whether scammers have stolen her identity and what she can do to protect herself.

Warning signs of identity theft listed by the Federal Trade Commission include: withdrawals from your bank account that you did not make, failure to receive bills you usually get, merchants refusing your checks, debt collectors calling you about debts you did not incur, charges on your credit card that you did not make or medical providers billing you for services you did not receive.