Archive for October, 2017

LegalShield’s IDShield Identity Theft Solution Leads the Industry in …

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

ADA, Okla.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–LegalShield,
one of North America’s leading providers of affordable legal plans and
the IDShield
identity theft solution for individuals and families, leads the identity
theft protection service industry with the most robust set of consumer
protection features on the market today.

“IDShield is the best choice for both individuals and families and it’s
clear to anyone looking at a comparison of features among products that
claim to offer identity protection,” said Jennifer Stueckler, Senior
IDShield Product Manager at LegalShield. “Not only does IDShield offer
the most complete list of features and functions, it is the only
protection product that includes full restoration services, handled by
dedicated licensed private investigators trained in helping people
recover from a hack or another form of ID theft. To us, this expert
involvement, combined with emergency service 24/7, makes IDShield the
best and only choice. The IDShield app puts these key features in the
palm of consumer’s hands,” continued Stueckler.

Beyond expert help in recovering from the theft of one’s identity or the
theft of personal information, IDShield is unique in detecting actual
fraud based on a Social Security number, not merely monitoring. This is
known as Social Security Number Skip Trace, a technique wherein an
IDShield private investigator can uncover potential fraud by looking at
databases that have restricted access based on certifications. The
general public cannot access these databases.

Further, IDShield includes a limited power of attorney feature that
empowers a dedicated private investigator to act on one’s behalf in
correcting bank and other records following an ID theft – and this
service is backed up by a $5 million service guarantee. The guarantee
means that the company will spend up to $5 million using licensed
private investigators to do whatever it takes for as long as it takes to
restore a stolen identity.

“Competing products may offer basic social media and internet monitoring
services, but IDShield also monitors a greater number of personal
elements in the ‘dark web,’ surveying millions of data points that
frequently slip under the radar, like chat rooms, malware samples and
anonymous web services. For the individual plan at $9.95 per month, only
IDShield offers important features such as a password vault, social
media monitoring, and a full-service mobile app with push-of-a-button
access to a dedicated, U.S.-based, licensed private investigator,”
Stueckler added.

The day after the recent Equifax credit reporting data breach was
revealed, Morgan Wright, U.S. State Department senior anti-terrorism
advisor, called into CNBC offering
tips on what consumers can immediately do to protect themselves from
consequences of the breach. Wright revealed that he uses IDShield to
protect his identity, in large part because IDShield uses professional
investigators to help its members in restoring their identity.

“Consumers are smart and are acting fast,” continued Stueckler. “With 40
percent of the U.S. population, or approximately 145.5 million people,
caught up in the Equifax breach, people now understand just how
catastrophic a breach can be. The recent breach won’t be the last, and
it is our hope that both individuals and heads of households will sign
up for ID protection.”

IDShield offers white-glove service in all areas of identity management,
while others only give members a do-it-yourself approach. IDShield helps
consumers navigate through the complexities of a multitude of areas of
exposure, often finding signs of identity theft lurking beneath the
surface of a standard monitoring alert. IDShield’s team of investigators
have special clearance to use government and agency databases that can
help speed up recovery from personal data and ID theft.

Because IDShield covers more than just credit information, consumers can
feel confident knowing that they’re already one step ahead, having the
best defense during events like the Equifax data breach.

IDShield starts at $9.95 per month for one adult, with family plans
starting at $19.95 monthly to protect the parents and up to eight
children. The plans include security monitoring of everything from
Social Security numbers and credit card numbers to court records and
new-address requests. IDShield also includes privacy monitoring for
things such as phone numbers and social media accounts and includes a
free password manager, to help secure personal information.

IDShield members have immediate access to the IDShield app, where they
can access credit scores and receive alerts via push notifications. When
members receive an alert, they can act directly from the app or get in
touch with licensed private investigators. IDShield provides members
access to licensed private investigators 24/7 for emergency situations.
The company’s investigators have an average of seven years of experience
and come from a variety of backgrounds, including banking, collection
and law enforcement.

About LegalShield

A pioneer in the democratization of affordable access to legal
protection, LegalShield is one of North America’s leading providers of
legal safeguards and protection against identity theft solutions for
individuals, families and small businesses. The 45-year-old company
protects more than 1,681,000 individuals, families and businesses
through its legal plans. In addition, LegalShield and IDShield serve
more than 141,000 businesses. Legal plans for individuals start as low
as $17.95, and identity theft plans start at $9.95.

LegalShield’s legal plans provide access to attorneys with an average of
19 years of experience in areas such as family matters, estate planning,
financial and business issues, consumer protection, tax, real estate,
benefits disputes and auto/driving issues. Unlike other legal plans or
do-it-yourself websites, LegalShield has dedicated law firms in 50
states and four provinces in Canada that members can call for help
without having to worry about high hourly rates.

IDShield provides identity monitoring and restoration services and is
the only identity theft protection company armed with a team of licensed
private investigators on call to restore a member’s identity. For more
information, call press and corporate relations at 580-436-1234.

This news release gives a general overview of identity theft
protection and restoration coverage. See plan details on for
specific terms, coverage, pricing, conditions and exclusions.

Article source: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20171030005127/en/LegalShields-IDShield-Identity-Theft-Solution-Leads-Industry

Technorati Tags: ,

Victim of ID theft tracks suspect in legal nightmare

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

This is a file photo of counterfeit documents seized by federal investigators. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -A Grand Rapids man used another man’s personal information to get a job, obtain loans and cause a financial and legal nightmare for a New Mexico man, court records say.

Franklin J. Flores, a Guatemalan man, allegedly used the identity of New Mexico’s Eli Grado.

Grado hired a private investigator to determine the imposter’s identity. It turned out to be a former classmate.

“Mr. Grado stated that he was subsequently forced to pay over $13,000 in taxes and ‘owns’ two trucks in Michigan due to the illegal activities of Franklin Flores. His attorney advised him that it would be cheaper and easier just to pay the $13K in taxes than try to fight the false allegations,” Thomas Schifini, resident agent in charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Grand Rapids.

Schifini filed a criminal complaint in U.S. District Court alleging that Flores committed fraud with identification documents.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Ray Kent on Monday, Oct. 30, ordered Flores held during a detention hearing in U.S. District Court in Grand Rapids. The case will be submitted to a grand jury for potential indictment.

After Grado hired a private investigator in 2014, Flores became the prime suspect.

In March, Grado talked to Wyoming police Officer Mitch Veldman by telephone.

He told the officer that someone had been using his identity for years. What started out as an inconvenience “escalated to law enforcement detentions in New Mexico and at the U.S./Canadian border due to outstanding criminal arrests under his name,” Schifini wrote in court documents.

“He was forced to provide a fingerprint sample in order to prove his true identity and innocence,” he wrote.

The private investigator obtained a Wyoming police booking photo from 2005 when the alleged imposter was arrested for possession of cocaine. Grado thought the man in the photo looked like a former classmate and confirmed that by going through his old high school yearbook

Veldman then pulled other police records involving Flores. He found that in an Oct. 5, 2005, traffic stop, Flores identified himself as Eli Grado, and used Grado’s date of birth and Social Security number.

Flores was arrested for possession of cocaine and booked into Kent County Jail under Grado’s name. Flores had a passenger in the car, a Guatemalan national who lived with him in Grand Rapids. She had been ordered deported but never left, the officer determined.

Grado then sent Veldman copies of his U.S. Passport, Social Security card, New Mexico driver’s license, and his fingerprints.

He also forwarded a copy of a New Mexico driver’s license with Flores’ photo. It had been sent inadvertently to Grado when Flores tried to get what appeared to be a legitimately issued driver’s license, Schifini wrote in his complaint.

“Officer Veldman noted that the image of this driver’s license matched the jail booking photograph of the imposter from the 2005 Kent County arrest and the Michigan (driver’s license) image,” Schifini wrote.

Veldman turned the case over to detectives who stopped at Flores’ house in the 600 block of London Street SW. A woman, who identified herself as “Eli’s mother-in-law” said a man named Grado and her daughter were at work.

When investigators talked with Flores, Flores was “very nervous,” and would not say where he worked, Schifini wrote.

He said he had to go and would call back. He didn’t, Schifini said.

Police set up a meeting through Flores’ attorney, Mary Gray Slawson, but he failed to show. He stopped communicating with his attorney, too, court records showed.

Detective Dennis Ferguson determined that Flores worked at Harter Stamping in Kentwood. Company officials confirmed an Eli Grado worked for them but had left early the day police stopped by.

Police looked at information Flores provided to get the job and company benefits. The photos did not match the worker.

Ferguson then contacted New Mexico Department of Public Safety for a copy of Flores’ fingerprints when he was arrested in 1997 under his own name for receiving stolen property and possession of cocaine.

Police determined the fingerprints from that case and Flores’ 2005 arrest in Kent County matched.

Flores used Grado’s name and information when he signed up for health insurance and when he got married, even listing the names of Grado’s parents, the federal investigator wrote.

Wyoming police obtained charges against Flores in August related to identity theft and making a false application for a state identification card. He was stopped by police Oct. 6 near 28th Street and U.S. 131, and provided a driver’s license under Grado’s name.

He came clean during the booking process and provided his real name, the federal investigator wrote.

He posted bond and was released.

On Oct. 12, Schifini talked to a company official who said Flores, using Gardo’s information, had filled out two forms to verify he was eligible to work in the U.S. He was first hired in 2013 but let go after concerns about identity-theft came up. He was rehired in 2016 because of his “expertise on a particular machine,” Schifini wrote.

Flores, as Grado, claimed to be a U.S. citizen, the government said.

Grado could not be reached. Records did not show how Flores allegedly obtained his personal information.

Federal agents on Oct. 26 used a search warrant at Flores’ Grand Rapids home, and arrested Flores at Royal Technologies in Hudsonville where he had been working.

He gave police consent to search his vehicle, which contained documentation in Eli Grado’s name. Police found similar paperwork at his home.

Police also found a .40-caliber pistol in teh driver of his home and ammunition in his car and home.

Asked about the gun, he said: “It must be mine,” records showed.

Based on a 2014 conviction for carrying a concealed weapon, he was not allowed to possess a firearm.

Flores allegedly told investigators he was from Guatemala and has lawful permanent residence but investigators could find no such evidence in searches of numerous databases, court records said.

Article source: http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2017/10/victim_of_id_theft_tracks_susp.html

Technorati Tags: ,

Wallethub ranks GA as one of worst states for Identity Theft & F …

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, nearly 40 percent of all fatal crashes on Halloween involve a drunk driver.

AAA and Budweiser wants to fight the fright by  asking all motorist to plan ahead if they are celebrating with alcohol.

Article source: http://www.wfxg.com/story/36722023/wallethub-ranks-ga-as-one-of-worst-states-for-identity-theft-fraud

Technorati Tags: ,

Wallethub ranks GA as one of worst states for Identity Theft & F …

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, nearly 40 percent of all fatal crashes on Halloween involve a drunk driver.

AAA and Budweiser wants to fight the fright by  asking all motorist to plan ahead if they are celebrating with alcohol.

Article source: http://www.wfxg.com/story/36722023/wallethub-ranks-ga-as-one-of-worst-states-for-identity-theft-fraud

Technorati Tags: ,

Wallethub ranks GA as one of worst states for Identity Theft & F …

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, nearly 40 percent of all fatal crashes on Halloween involve a drunk driver.

AAA and Budweiser wants to fight the fright by  asking all motorist to plan ahead if they are celebrating with alcohol.

Article source: http://www.wfxg.com/story/36722023/wallethub-ranks-ga-as-one-of-worst-states-for-identity-theft-fraud

Technorati Tags: ,

Victim of ID theft tracks suspect in legal nightmare

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

This is a file photo of counterfeit documents seized by federal investigators. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -A Grand Rapids man used another man’s personal information to get a job, obtain loans and cause a financial and legal nightmare for a New Mexico man, court records say.

Franklin J. Flores, a Guatemalan man, allegedly used the identity of New Mexico’s Eli Grado.

Grado hired a private investigator to determine the imposter’s identity. It turned out to be a former classmate.

“Mr. Grado stated that he was subsequently forced to pay over $13,000 in taxes and ‘owns’ two trucks in Michigan due to the illegal activities of Franklin Flores. His attorney advised him that it would be cheaper and easier just to pay the $13K in taxes than try to fight the false allegations,” Thomas Schifini, resident agent in charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Grand Rapids.

Schifini filed a criminal complaint in U.S. District Court alleging that Flores committed fraud with identification documents.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Ray Kent on Monday, Oct. 30, ordered Flores held during a detention hearing in U.S. District Court in Grand Rapids. The case will be submitted to a grand jury for potential indictment.

After Grado hired a private investigator in 2014, Flores became the prime suspect.

In March, Grado talked to Wyoming police Officer Mitch Veldman by telephone.

He told the officer that someone had been using his identity for years. What started out as an inconvenience “escalated to law enforcement detentions in New Mexico and at the U.S./Canadian border due to outstanding criminal arrests under his name,” Schifini wrote in court documents.

“He was forced to provide a fingerprint sample in order to prove his true identity and innocence,” he wrote.

The private investigator obtained a Wyoming police booking photo from 2005 when the alleged imposter was arrested for possession of cocaine. Grado thought the man in the photo looked like a former classmate and confirmed that by going through his old high school yearbook

Veldman then pulled other police records involving Flores. He found that in an Oct. 5, 2005, traffic stop, Flores identified himself as Eli Grado, and used Grado’s date of birth and Social Security number.

Flores was arrested for possession of cocaine and booked into Kent County Jail under Grado’s name. Flores had a passenger in the car, a Guatemalan national who lived with him in Grand Rapids. She had been ordered deported but never left, the officer determined.

Grado then sent Veldman copies of his U.S. Passport, Social Security card, New Mexico driver’s license, and his fingerprints.

He also forwarded a copy of a New Mexico driver’s license with Flores’ photo. It had been sent inadvertently to Grado when Flores tried to get what appeared to be a legitimately issued driver’s license, Schifini wrote in his complaint.

“Officer Veldman noted that the image of this driver’s license matched the jail booking photograph of the imposter from the 2005 Kent County arrest and the Michigan (driver’s license) image,” Schifini wrote.

Veldman turned the case over to detectives who stopped at Flores’ house in the 600 block of London Street SW. A woman, who identified herself as “Eli’s mother-in-law” said a man named Grado and her daughter were at work.

When investigators talked with Flores, Flores was “very nervous,” and would not say where he worked, Schifini wrote.

He said he had to go and would call back. He didn’t, Schifini said.

Police set up a meeting through Flores’ attorney, Mary Gray Slawson, but he failed to show. He stopped communicating with his attorney, too, court records showed.

Detective Dennis Ferguson determined that Flores worked at Harter Stamping in Kentwood. Company officials confirmed an Eli Grado worked for them but had left early the day police stopped by.

Police looked at information Flores provided to get the job and company benefits. The photos did not match the worker.

Ferguson then contacted New Mexico Department of Public Safety for a copy of Flores’ fingerprints when he was arrested in 1997 under his own name for receiving stolen property and possession of cocaine.

Police determined the fingerprints from that case and Flores’ 2005 arrest in Kent County matched.

Flores used Grado’s name and information when he signed up for health insurance and when he got married, even listing the names of Grado’s parents, the federal investigator wrote.

Wyoming police obtained charges against Flores in August related to identity theft and making a false application for a state identification card. He was stopped by police Oct. 6 near 28th Street and U.S. 131, and provided a driver’s license under Grado’s name.

He came clean during the booking process and provided his real name, the federal investigator wrote.

He posted bond and was released.

On Oct. 12, Schifini talked to a company official who said Flores, using Gardo’s information, had filled out two forms to verify he was eligible to work in the U.S. He was first hired in 2013 but let go after concerns about identity-theft came up. He was rehired in 2016 because of his “expertise on a particular machine,” Schifini wrote.

Flores, as Grado, claimed to be a U.S. citizen, the government said.

Grado could not be reached. Records did not show how Flores allegedly obtained his personal information.

Federal agents on Oct. 26 used a search warrant at Flores’ Grand Rapids home, and arrested Flores at Royal Technologies in Hudsonville where he had been working.

He gave police consent to search his vehicle, which contained documentation in Eli Grado’s name. Police found similar paperwork at his home.

Police also found a .40-caliber pistol in teh driver of his home and ammunition in his car and home.

Asked about the gun, he said: “It must be mine,” records showed.

Based on a 2014 conviction for carrying a concealed weapon, he was not allowed to possess a firearm.

Flores allegedly told investigators he was from Guatemala and has lawful permanent residence but investigators could find no such evidence in searches of numerous databases, court records said.

Article source: http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2017/10/victim_of_id_theft_tracks_susp.html

Technorati Tags: ,

Victim of ID theft tracks suspect in legal nightmare

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

This is a file photo of counterfeit documents seized by federal investigators. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -A Grand Rapids man used another man’s personal information to get a job, obtain loans and cause a financial and legal nightmare for a New Mexico man, court records say.

Franklin J. Flores, a Guatemalan man, allegedly used the identity of New Mexico’s Eli Grado.

Grado hired a private investigator to determine the imposter’s identity. It turned out to be a former classmate.

“Mr. Grado stated that he was subsequently forced to pay over $13,000 in taxes and ‘owns’ two trucks in Michigan due to the illegal activities of Franklin Flores. His attorney advised him that it would be cheaper and easier just to pay the $13K in taxes than try to fight the false allegations,” Thomas Schifini, resident agent in charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Grand Rapids.

Schifini filed a criminal complaint in U.S. District Court alleging that Flores committed fraud with identification documents.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Ray Kent on Monday, Oct. 30, ordered Flores held during a detention hearing in U.S. District Court in Grand Rapids. The case will be submitted to a grand jury for potential indictment.

After Grado hired a private investigator in 2014, Flores became the prime suspect.

In March, Grado talked to Wyoming police Officer Mitch Veldman by telephone.

He told the officer that someone had been using his identity for years. What started out as an inconvenience “escalated to law enforcement detentions in New Mexico and at the U.S./Canadian border due to outstanding criminal arrests under his name,” Schifini wrote in court documents.

“He was forced to provide a fingerprint sample in order to prove his true identity and innocence,” he wrote.

The private investigator obtained a Wyoming police booking photo from 2005 when the alleged imposter was arrested for possession of cocaine. Grado thought the man in the photo looked like a former classmate and confirmed that by going through his old high school yearbook

Veldman then pulled other police records involving Flores. He found that in an Oct. 5, 2005, traffic stop, Flores identified himself as Eli Grado, and used Grado’s date of birth and Social Security number.

Flores was arrested for possession of cocaine and booked into Kent County Jail under Grado’s name. Flores had a passenger in the car, a Guatemalan national who lived with him in Grand Rapids. She had been ordered deported but never left, the officer determined.

Grado then sent Veldman copies of his U.S. Passport, Social Security card, New Mexico driver’s license, and his fingerprints.

He also forwarded a copy of a New Mexico driver’s license with Flores’ photo. It had been sent inadvertently to Grado when Flores tried to get what appeared to be a legitimately issued driver’s license, Schifini wrote in his complaint.

“Officer Veldman noted that the image of this driver’s license matched the jail booking photograph of the imposter from the 2005 Kent County arrest and the Michigan (driver’s license) image,” Schifini wrote.

Veldman turned the case over to detectives who stopped at Flores’ house in the 600 block of London Street SW. A woman, who identified herself as “Eli’s mother-in-law” said a man named Grado and her daughter were at work.

When investigators talked with Flores, Flores was “very nervous,” and would not say where he worked, Schifini wrote.

He said he had to go and would call back. He didn’t, Schifini said.

Police set up a meeting through Flores’ attorney, Mary Gray Slawson, but he failed to show. He stopped communicating with his attorney, too, court records showed.

Detective Dennis Ferguson determined that Flores worked at Harter Stamping in Kentwood. Company officials confirmed an Eli Grado worked for them but had left early the day police stopped by.

Police looked at information Flores provided to get the job and company benefits. The photos did not match the worker.

Ferguson then contacted New Mexico Department of Public Safety for a copy of Flores’ fingerprints when he was arrested in 1997 under his own name for receiving stolen property and possession of cocaine.

Police determined the fingerprints from that case and Flores’ 2005 arrest in Kent County matched.

Flores used Grado’s name and information when he signed up for health insurance and when he got married, even listing the names of Grado’s parents, the federal investigator wrote.

Wyoming police obtained charges against Flores in August related to identity theft and making a false application for a state identification card. He was stopped by police Oct. 6 near 28th Street and U.S. 131, and provided a driver’s license under Grado’s name.

He came clean during the booking process and provided his real name, the federal investigator wrote.

He posted bond and was released.

On Oct. 12, Schifini talked to a company official who said Flores, using Gardo’s information, had filled out two forms to verify he was eligible to work in the U.S. He was first hired in 2013 but let go after concerns about identity-theft came up. He was rehired in 2016 because of his “expertise on a particular machine,” Schifini wrote.

Flores, as Grado, claimed to be a U.S. citizen, the government said.

Grado could not be reached. Records did not show how Flores allegedly obtained his personal information.

Federal agents on Oct. 26 used a search warrant at Flores’ Grand Rapids home, and arrested Flores at Royal Technologies in Hudsonville where he had been working.

He gave police consent to search his vehicle, which contained documentation in Eli Grado’s name. Police found similar paperwork at his home.

Police also found a .40-caliber pistol in teh driver of his home and ammunition in his car and home.

Asked about the gun, he said: “It must be mine,” records showed.

Based on a 2014 conviction for carrying a concealed weapon, he was not allowed to possess a firearm.

Flores allegedly told investigators he was from Guatemala and has lawful permanent residence but investigators could find no such evidence in searches of numerous databases, court records said.

Article source: http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2017/10/victim_of_id_theft_tracks_susp.html

Technorati Tags: ,

Victim of ID theft tracks suspect in legal nightmare

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

This is a file photo of counterfeit documents seized by federal investigators. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -A Grand Rapids man used another man’s personal information to get a job, obtain loans and cause a financial and legal nightmare for a New Mexico man, court records say.

Franklin J. Flores, a Guatemalan man, allegedly used the identity of New Mexico’s Eli Grado.

Grado hired a private investigator to determine the imposter’s identity. It turned out to be a former classmate.

“Mr. Grado stated that he was subsequently forced to pay over $13,000 in taxes and ‘owns’ two trucks in Michigan due to the illegal activities of Franklin Flores. His attorney advised him that it would be cheaper and easier just to pay the $13K in taxes than try to fight the false allegations,” Thomas Schifini, resident agent in charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Grand Rapids.

Schifini filed a criminal complaint in U.S. District Court alleging that Flores committed fraud with identification documents.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Ray Kent on Monday, Oct. 30, ordered Flores held during a detention hearing in U.S. District Court in Grand Rapids. The case will be submitted to a grand jury for potential indictment.

After Grado hired a private investigator in 2014, Flores became the prime suspect.

In March, Grado talked to Wyoming police Officer Mitch Veldman by telephone.

He told the officer that someone had been using his identity for years. What started out as an inconvenience “escalated to law enforcement detentions in New Mexico and at the U.S./Canadian border due to outstanding criminal arrests under his name,” Schifini wrote in court documents.

“He was forced to provide a fingerprint sample in order to prove his true identity and innocence,” he wrote.

The private investigator obtained a Wyoming police booking photo from 2005 when the alleged imposter was arrested for possession of cocaine. Grado thought the man in the photo looked like a former classmate and confirmed that by going through his old high school yearbook

Veldman then pulled other police records involving Flores. He found that in an Oct. 5, 2005, traffic stop, Flores identified himself as Eli Grado, and used Grado’s date of birth and Social Security number.

Flores was arrested for possession of cocaine and booked into Kent County Jail under Grado’s name. Flores had a passenger in the car, a Guatemalan national who lived with him in Grand Rapids. She had been ordered deported but never left, the officer determined.

Grado then sent Veldman copies of his U.S. Passport, Social Security card, New Mexico driver’s license, and his fingerprints.

He also forwarded a copy of a New Mexico driver’s license with Flores’ photo. It had been sent inadvertently to Grado when Flores tried to get what appeared to be a legitimately issued driver’s license, Schifini wrote in his complaint.

“Officer Veldman noted that the image of this driver’s license matched the jail booking photograph of the imposter from the 2005 Kent County arrest and the Michigan (driver’s license) image,” Schifini wrote.

Veldman turned the case over to detectives who stopped at Flores’ house in the 600 block of London Street SW. A woman, who identified herself as “Eli’s mother-in-law” said a man named Grado and her daughter were at work.

When investigators talked with Flores, Flores was “very nervous,” and would not say where he worked, Schifini wrote.

He said he had to go and would call back. He didn’t, Schifini said.

Police set up a meeting through Flores’ attorney, Mary Gray Slawson, but he failed to show. He stopped communicating with his attorney, too, court records showed.

Detective Dennis Ferguson determined that Flores worked at Harter Stamping in Kentwood. Company officials confirmed an Eli Grado worked for them but had left early the day police stopped by.

Police looked at information Flores provided to get the job and company benefits. The photos did not match the worker.

Ferguson then contacted New Mexico Department of Public Safety for a copy of Flores’ fingerprints when he was arrested in 1997 under his own name for receiving stolen property and possession of cocaine.

Police determined the fingerprints from that case and Flores’ 2005 arrest in Kent County matched.

Flores used Grado’s name and information when he signed up for health insurance and when he got married, even listing the names of Grado’s parents, the federal investigator wrote.

Wyoming police obtained charges against Flores in August related to identity theft and making a false application for a state identification card. He was stopped by police Oct. 6 near 28th Street and U.S. 131, and provided a driver’s license under Grado’s name.

He came clean during the booking process and provided his real name, the federal investigator wrote.

He posted bond and was released.

On Oct. 12, Schifini talked to a company official who said Flores, using Gardo’s information, had filled out two forms to verify he was eligible to work in the U.S. He was first hired in 2013 but let go after concerns about identity-theft came up. He was rehired in 2016 because of his “expertise on a particular machine,” Schifini wrote.

Flores, as Grado, claimed to be a U.S. citizen, the government said.

Grado could not be reached. Records did not show how Flores allegedly obtained his personal information.

Federal agents on Oct. 26 used a search warrant at Flores’ Grand Rapids home, and arrested Flores at Royal Technologies in Hudsonville where he had been working.

He gave police consent to search his vehicle, which contained documentation in Eli Grado’s name. Police found similar paperwork at his home.

Police also found a .40-caliber pistol in teh driver of his home and ammunition in his car and home.

Asked about the gun, he said: “It must be mine,” records showed.

Based on a 2014 conviction for carrying a concealed weapon, he was not allowed to possess a firearm.

Flores allegedly told investigators he was from Guatemala and has lawful permanent residence but investigators could find no such evidence in searches of numerous databases, court records said.

Article source: http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2017/10/victim_of_id_theft_tracks_susp.html

Technorati Tags: ,

Texas men accused of identity theft – Daily Comet

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

Texas men accused of identity theft

Four Texas men were arrested after officers stopped them Friday morning and found 13 identification cards that didn’t belong to any of them, the Lafourche Parish Sheriff’s Office said.

Isaac Gonzales, 33, and Christopher Nunez, 31, both of Pasadena; John W. Johnson, 66, of Cameron; and his son, John F. Johnson, 43, of Houston, are each charged with 13 counts of identity theft. Nunez is also charged with contempt of court.

Detectives began investigating a forgery complaint at a south Lafourche marine transportation company in March, Sheriff Craig Webre said in a news release. Over $20,000 in fraudulent checks had been used.

Webre said investigators learned a car registered to John W. Johnson was used to cash the checks. Deputies found John F. Johnson driving the car Friday, with the other three as passengers.

The four suspects remained in the Lafourche jail Monday. Gonzales and the Johnsons were being held on bonds of $250,000 each, and Nunez was being held on a bond of $250,200.

Webre said additional charges are expected as the Sheriff’s Office continues investigating.

Article source: http://www.dailycomet.com/news/20171030/texas-men-accused-of-identity-theft

Technorati Tags: ,

Texas men accused of identity theft – Daily Comet

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

Texas men accused of identity theft

Four Texas men were arrested after officers stopped them Friday morning and found 13 identification cards that didn’t belong to any of them, the Lafourche Parish Sheriff’s Office said.

Isaac Gonzales, 33, and Christopher Nunez, 31, both of Pasadena; John W. Johnson, 66, of Cameron; and his son, John F. Johnson, 43, of Houston, are each charged with 13 counts of identity theft. Nunez is also charged with contempt of court.

Detectives began investigating a forgery complaint at a south Lafourche marine transportation company in March, Sheriff Craig Webre said in a news release. Over $20,000 in fraudulent checks had been used.

Webre said investigators learned a car registered to John W. Johnson was used to cash the checks. Deputies found John F. Johnson driving the car Friday, with the other three as passengers.

The four suspects remained in the Lafourche jail Monday. Gonzales and the Johnsons were being held on bonds of $250,000 each, and Nunez was being held on a bond of $250,200.

Webre said additional charges are expected as the Sheriff’s Office continues investigating.

Article source: http://www.dailycomet.com/news/20171030/texas-men-accused-of-identity-theft

Technorati Tags: ,