Archive for October, 2016

Identity Theft Issues Continue in Elmhurst: Police

Saturday, October 29th, 2016

Not one, but five identity thefts were reported in Elmhurst this past week. Below are details on each of the cases. If you have information about any of these instances or have experienced something similar yourself, contact the Elmhurst Police’s non-emergency line at 630-530-3050.

  • Oct. 20: A man received an email from Kohl’s informing him that the email address on his Kohl’s account had been changed. After contacting the store about the situation, the man found his account’s email had been changed and the account had been used.
  • Oct. 8-Oct. 20: A man reported to the police that he had gotten three credit cards in the mail, none of which he’d applied for. He was able to contact the companies and shut down the cards, though he doesn’t know who used his information to apply for the cards.
  • Dec. 2013-May 2014: A case was reopened this past week when siblings reported to the police that an unknown person had cashed into their mother’s life insurance policy prematurely. A corresponding check was deposited into the mom’s bank account, and several other checks were drawn from the same account.
  • Oct. 24: A man claimed that someone had used his uncle’s login information to buy a 2014 Mercedes Benz E63 AMG from the Manheim Milwaukee Auto Auction. The man was able to get in touch with auction authorities and put a hold on the vehicle, so it hasn’t been released to the criminal. Police say the case is under investigation.
  • Oct. 25: A man reported that someone opened several Discover accounts using his information. The accounts have since been canceled.

Image via Shutterstock.

Article source: http://patch.com/illinois/elmhurst/identity-theft-issues-continue-elmhurst-police

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Car prowling, Rolex-buying ID theft suspect: Help identify crooks caught on camera buying $13K watch with stolen …

Saturday, October 29th, 2016

rolexWANTED IN LYNNWOOD —
A warning tonight to all of you who think you live in a quiet neighborhood that’s safe from thieves — you don’t — they know you work hard and have nice things and they want to take them from you.

This crook wanted something especially nice for himself and it’s what he bought with a stolen credit card that may help catch him.

Take a look at the surveillance video from a jewelry store. It shows the thief Lynnwood Police are trying to identify. You might spot him from the new steel and gold Rolex he’s sporting now after using Paul Olmsted’s stolen credit card to buy it.

“Well, I was shocked,” Olmsted said. “I couldn’t believe when I looked at my Visa bill and there was a charge of over $13,000. I couldn’t imagine what it was.”

Olmsted says his credit cards were stolen out of his wallet that he left in his car while he worked out at the Bothell YMCA. “Within hours of the credit cards being taken, the suspect made a fake West Virginia driver`s license, presented it over here, Lynnwood, to several stores in the area,” adds Lynnwood Det. Brad Reorda.

Detective Reorda say the suspect knew exactly what he wanted. “He didn`t spend a whole lot of time looking at jewelry or watches, walked in, picks one watch out and spends, I believe, 15 or so minutes completing the transaction, sales receipt and the whole deal and then walks out with the watch.”

The suspect also charged $6,000 at Costco and a hundred bucks buying some shoes at another store.

Olmsted adds, “I would say to anybody that thinks it only happens to others that it can happen to anybody.”

Identify theft is a huge problem nowadays. “You think about it, in 8 hours our suspect was able to create, takeover someone else`s identity and spend $20,000,” said Det. Reorda. “This happens daily. It`s very important to catch these guys. We see that they`re getting more and more advanced each time they do it, from creating fake ID`s to washing checks. There`s all kinds of different crimes that are associated with identity theft.”

Olmsted is certainly much more cautious now. “Watching where I park even, making sure I park by a streetlight or at the end of a row where people would be more visible if they were trying to break into my car so I’m just much more careful.”

If you can identify him, call an anonymous tip into:
CRIME STOPPERS: 1-800-222-TIPS

You must call the Crime Stoppers hotline with your tip to be eligible to receive a cash reward for information leading to a fugitive’s arrest.

Article source: http://q13fox.com/2016/10/28/car-prowling-rolex-buying-id-theft-suspect-help-identify-crooks-caught-on-camera-buying-13k-watch-with-stolen-credit-card/

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Identity theft arrest in Red Oak

Saturday, October 29th, 2016

(Red Oak) — A Red Oak woman was arrested for identity theft Thursday night.

The Red Oak Police Department reports 31-year-old Colbie Jo Sue Fike was taken into custody shortly before 7 p.m. for driving while suspended — a simple misdemeanor — and a Montgomery County warrant for identity theft — an aggravated misdemeanor. Fike was booked into the Montgomery County Jail on $2,000 cash bond.

No further details were released.

Article source: http://www.kmaland.com/news/identity-theft-arrest-in-red-oak/article_45053c70-9cf7-11e6-a67e-4f942c35c9e3.html

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Jackson woman indicted for identity theft, exploitation of vulnerable adult

Saturday, October 29th, 2016

JACKSON, Miss. (WJTV) — A Jackson woman has been arrested for identity theft and exploitation of a vulnerable adult.

Attorney General Jim Hood said 28-year-old Leslie Burkett turned herself into the Rankin County Sheriff’s Office Thursday. She was indicted by a grand jury for one count of fraud-identity theft and one count of exploitation of a vulnerable adult.

Her bond was set at  $5,000.

If convicted of both counts, Burkett faces up to 20 years in prison.

Article source: http://wjtv.com/2016/10/28/jackson-woman-indicted-for-identity-theft-exploitation-of-vulnerable-adult/

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Woman involved in identity theft ring facing additional prison time for …

Saturday, October 29th, 2016

A Seal woman who was involved in an identity theft ring was sentenced to six months in prison on Wednesday for contempt of court, the Department of Justice announced.

 

Elizabeth Ann Grant, 53, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to file fraudulent income tax returns, aggravated identity theft and embezzling mail on Nov. 15, 2015. These charges come from her involvement in an identity theft ring that operated in and around Phenix City. Grant received a 70-month prison sentence for those offenses and was ordered to pay restitution, the DOJ said.

In the tax fraud case, the judge told Grant that she could not access her federal retirement savings account for the purpose of paying the ordered restitution. Instead of turning the money over to the government, authorities said Grant took $32,000 out of her account. She spent the money at casinos, restaurants, convenient stores and grocery stores. Her actions led to the contempt of court charge.

“The defendant in this case thumbed her nose at the court’s instructions,” U.S. Attorney George Beck Jr.  said. “This case demonstrates that the Court and this office do not take lightly willful disobedience of a court order and will seek to punish such misconduct when it occurs.”  

Article source: http://www.al.com/news/montgomery/index.ssf/2016/10/woman_involved_in_identity_the.html

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Andy’s Identity Theft

Friday, October 28th, 2016

Article source: http://www.myhighplains.com/news/andys-identity-theft

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Woman involved in identity theft ring facing additional prison time for contempt of court

Friday, October 28th, 2016

A Seal woman who was involved in an identity theft ring was sentenced to six months in prison on Wednesday for contempt of court, the Department of Justice announced.

 

Elizabeth Ann Grant, 53, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to file fraudulent income tax returns, aggravated identity theft and embezzling mail on Nov. 15, 2015. These charges come from her involvement in an identity theft ring that operated in and around Phenix City. Grant received a 70-month prison sentence for those offenses and was ordered to pay restitution, the DOJ said.

In the tax fraud case, the judge told Grant that she could not access her federal retirement savings account for the purpose of paying the ordered restitution. Instead of turning the money over to the government, authorities said Grant took $32,000 out of her account. She spent the money at casinos, restaurants, convenient stores and grocery stores. Her actions led to the contempt of court charge.

“The defendant in this case thumbed her nose at the court’s instructions,” U.S. Attorney George Beck Jr.  said. “This case demonstrates that the Court and this office do not take lightly willful disobedience of a court order and will seek to punish such misconduct when it occurs.”  

Article source: http://www.al.com/news/montgomery/index.ssf/2016/10/woman_involved_in_identity_the.html

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Hammond woman indicted on aggravated identity theft charge

Friday, October 28th, 2016


Lauren covers breaking news, crime and courts for The Times. She previously worked at The Herald-News in Joliet covering government, public policy, and the region’s heroin epidemic. She holds a master’s degree in Public Affairs Reporting.

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Article source: http://www.nwitimes.com/news/crime-and-court/hammond-woman-indicted-on-aggravated-identity-theft-charge/article_b1808dbb-fd5f-55ff-92cf-eecaa897503b.html

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How military members can protect against ID theft while overseas

Friday, October 28th, 2016

How an active-duty alert works | © Vladimir Melnik/Shutterstock.com

How an active-duty alert works

According to the CFPB, an active-duty alert notifies anyone who obtains a service member’s credit report that he or she is on active duty.

Lenders who receive a report with this alert are legally required to take “reasonable steps” to verify the borrower’s identify before they approve new credit. Those steps might include calling a telephone number the service member provided when he or she set up the alert.

The alert remains on the military member’s credit file for 12 months, unless he or she requests that it be removed sooner.

To add or remove an alert, the service member must contact at least one of the 3 major credit bureaus — Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. Each bureau has different procedures to initiate an active-duty alert online, by phone or through U.S. mail.

These 3 bureaus are required to share this information, so setting up an alert with one should trigger an alert being placed on the other 2 credit files as well.

A 4th credit agency Innovis does not participate in this data sharing but can be notified separately.

An active-duty alert also removes the military member’s name from prescreened offers for credit and insurance for 2 years, unless he or she opts in or removes the alert during that timeframe.

An active-duty alert should not affect the service member’s credit history or credit score.


Why get an active-duty alert? © Glynnis Jones/Shutterstock.com

Why get an active-duty alert?

Financial planners who advise military members say the active-duty alert is a wise precaution.

“I definitely recommend it,” says Rob Aeschbach, owner of The Military Financial Planner, a planning firm in Norfolk, Virginia.

Aeschbach cites 2 reasons for his recommendation. First, service members might not receive U.S. mail for weeks at a time, and 2nd, moving frequently is a fact of military life and can mean that some U.S. mail never arrives.

“If someone opens an account fraudulently (in your name), the normal notifications from lenders — welcome to your new account — might be way too late before you find out about it,” Aeschbach says.

Jason Reiman, owner of Get Financially Fit, a planning firm in Tucson, Arizona, says anyone who’s not actively shopping for a loan should obtain a credit freeze, which shuts down access to additional credit until it’s removed.

A credit freeze will not only block fraudsters, it will also add another hurdle to being able to obtain credit.

“It gives you time to sort through your purchase decision,” Reiman says.


Add a layer of protection© aarrows/Shutterstock.com

Add a layer of protection

Military members stationed outside the U.S. might not be able to monitor their credit history from a foreign-country internet IP address, according to Eva Velasquez, president/CEO of the ID Theft Resource Center, a San Diego-based nonprofit that assists identity-theft victims.

This roadblock means service members may have to use the U.S. mail to obtain their free annual credit reports, an approach that’s less convenient. 

Setting up an active-duty credit-reporting alert, especially from outside the country, might not be convenient, either. Still, that’s no reason not to do it, Velasquez says.

“The inconvenience is worth it when you consider that it’s one more layer of protection from having an identity-theft issue occur,” she says.


How banks handle alerts © Getmilitaryphotos/Shutterstock.com

How banks handle alerts

When lenders receive a credit report with an active-duty alert, they’re supposed to take “reasonable steps” to verify the credit applicant’s identity.

Dietrich says the lender is supposed to use the contact information provided by the credit bureau with the credit report to contact the service member or his or her designated representative.

What steps lenders actually take and whether they differ in any way from how they routinely verify other borrowers’ identities isn’t clear.

Lenders have “a huge incentive” to make sure military members are who they says they are, says Nessa Feddis, deputy chief counsel of consumer protection and payments at the American Bankers Association, a Washington-based trade group that represents major banks.

Beyond that, she says, banks don’t want to publicize their anti-fraud procedures.

“Each bank is going to take individual steps, and that’s going to vary and it’s going to change. By definition, it has to,” Feddis says. “What we don’t want to do is advise the identity thieves on how to circumvent the controls.”


Prescreen opt-out options © Infinite_Eye/Shutterstock.com

Prescreen opt-out options

The 2-year prescreen opt-out that comes with the active-duty alert is intended to reduce the risk that criminals could intercept and fraudulently accept credit or insurance offers that are sent to the service member through the U.S. mail while he or she is on active duty.

“That’s not going to happen because they’re not getting sent these prescreen offers,” Dietrich says.

Military members don’t have to request an active-duty alert to obtain this protection.

In fact, anyone can opt out of prescreened credit and insurance offers for 5 years online or permanently by U.S. mail, according to OptOutPrescreen.com, a website for consumers that’s operated by the credit bureaus. To opt out, submit your request through the website or call (888) 567-8688.

Article source: http://www.bankrate.com/finance/identity-theft/military-members-id-theft-1.aspx

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Three Plead Guilty to Identity Theft Scheme – Sentencing Set in 2017

Friday, October 28th, 2016

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Article source: http://www.emissourian.com/local_news/three-plead-guilty-to-identity-theft-scheme---sentencing/article_7733e9f6-ac6e-5313-9508-6fc1cffb30a0.html

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