Archive for December, 2014

Kenmore man arrested on felony identity theft charges

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014



Happenings large and small gave us many reasons to remember 2014 as a remarkable year

All years are a mix of good and bad, and the proportions can change with location. Even still, some years stand out, and this was one of them: In West…

Read more »

Article source: http://www.buffalonews.com/city-region/kenmore-man-arrested-on-felony-identity-theft-charges-20141230

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Police looking for two identity theft suspects

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014
atm suspectsatm suspects

WARWICK, R.I. (WPRI) — The Warwick Police Department are looking to identify two suspects who have been involved in numerous thefts.

The pair are wanted for the thefts of wallets and purses, and then using the stolen identities, including checks to obtain money at various banks.

Most of the stolen items were taken from unattended vehicles parked at gyms while the victims were inside working out.

The male and female suspects are said to have committed the crimes at several Citizens Banks and Santander Banks in East Providence, Pawtucket, and Shrewsbury, MA on Oct. 22.

Several thousand dollars were fraudulently obtained in these transactions.

The suspects in the surveillance photos are said to be driving in a used newer model tan or silver colored Kia Optima, with no front plate.

The Rhode Island State Police are investigating more related crimes possibly involving the same suspects.

If you have any information about the identity of the two suspects or where they are, please contact Warwick Police Department at 401-468-4273

Article source: http://wpri.com/2014/12/30/police-looking-for-two-identity-theft-suspects/

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Pleasanton: 3 suspects arrests in identity-theft crimes

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014

Click photo to enlarge

PLEASANTON — Police overnight arrested three people at a Tri-Valley hotel and confiscated computers, an embossing machine, fake credit cards and other items in connection to an identity theft ring targeting dozens of Bay Area residents.

About 12:36 a.m., an officer on routine patrol saw three men standing outside of a vehicle in the parking lot at the Larkspur Landing Hotel and a license plate check revealed the vehicle was stolen out of Hayward, Sgt. Eric Gora said.

Jason Brown, 25, was arrested on suspicion of possession of a stolen vehicle, possession of stolen property and possession of personal information of close to a dozen Bay Area residents after police found items including personal information and stolen mail that belonged to them inside the vehicle.

Brown also allegedly had other evidence in his pockets that connected him to identity theft. Police did not say what that evidence was.

Officers learned Brown was associated with a room inside the hotel and found Heather Maiale, 25, of Mountain House and Chase Alves, 25, of Castro Valley walking out of the room. Both were on probation, and during a probation search of the room, were found in possession of illegal narcotics along with credit cards that did not belong to them, police said.

Police also found computers, an embossing machine, narcotics, fake credit cards and stolen property in the room.

Maiale was arrested on suspicion of identity theft, possession of narcotics and for a probation violation and Alves was arrested on suspicion of possession of narcotics and for a probation violation.

Police on Tuesday said they were working to contact the victims and that the case remained under investigation.

Anyone with information about the case is asked to call police at 925-931-5100.

Contact Natalie Neysa Alund at 510-293-2469. Follow her at Twitter.com/nataliealund.

Article source: http://www.contracostatimes.com/breaking-news/ci_27228439/pleasanton-3-suspects-arrests-identity-theft-crimes

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Pleasanton: 3 suspects arrested for identity-theft crimes

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014

Click photo to enlarge

PLEASANTON — Police overnight arrested three people at a Tri-Valley hotel and confiscated computers, an embossing machine, fake credit cards and other items in connection to an identity theft ring targeting dozens of Bay Area residents.

About 12:36 a.m., an officer on routine patrol saw three men standing outside of a vehicle in the parking lot at the Larkspur Landing Hotel and a license plate check revealed the vehicle was stolen out of Hayward, Sgt. Eric Gora said.

Jason Brown, 25, was arrested on suspicion of possession of a stolen vehicle, possession of stolen property and possession of personal information of close to a dozen Bay Area residents after police found items including personal information and stolen mail that belonged to them inside the vehicle.

Brown also allegedly had other evidence in his pockets that connected him to identity theft. Police did not say what that evidence was.

Officers learned Brown was associated with a room inside the hotel and found Heather Maiale, 25, of Mountain House and Chase Alves, 25, of Castro Valley walking out of the room. Both were on probation, and during a probation search of the room, were found in possession of illegal narcotics along with credit cards that did not belong to them, police said.

Police also found computers, an embossing machine, narcotics, fake credit cards and stolen property in the room.

Maiale was arrested on suspicion of identity theft, possession of narcotics and for a probation violation and Alves was arrested on suspicion of possession of narcotics and for a probation violation.

Police on Tuesday said they were working to contact the victims and that the case remained under investigation.

Anyone with information about the case is asked to call police at 925-931-5100.

Contact Natalie Neysa Alund at 510-293-2469. Follow her at Twitter.com/nataliealund.

Article source: http://www.contracostatimes.com/breaking-news/ci_27228439/pleasanton-3-suspects-arrests-identity-theft-crimes

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Scottsville residents report identity theft

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014

A report was made Dec. 23 from a residence on FM 1998 in Scottsville to the Harrison County Sheriff’s Office regarding identity theft.

According to Lt. Jay Webb with the HCSO, the resident’s identification was used without consent to obtain a credit card.

“Identity theft has become an absolute everyday thing,” Webb said, “and many times people don’t realize their identity has been misused until they see a bill.”

In the case of the report made from Scottsville, Webb said the resident had received a letter from the credit card company thanking him/her for applying for credit.

“They put in a call to the company and said they didn’t apply for a credit card, and got it taken care of pretty quickly,” he said.

“When it comes to identity theft, one of the most common things to do first is to pull your credit report. Anytime anyone tries to access your credit report, a notation is made,” Webb said.

He advised people to call one of the three credit bureaus, if not all three, to check their reports. Equifax can be reached at (800)685-1111 or www.equifax.com. Experian can be reached at (888)397-3742 or at www.experian.com. TransUnion can be reached at (800)888-4213 or www.transunion.com.

“Usually when we, the sheriff’s office, get involved it is to verify that this was a false account. So many times when this happens, it is hard to track down, and the credit card companies will just write off the debt, and notify the consumer,” Webb said.

In other law enforcement news, the following arrests and reports were made.

Arrests made by Marshall Police Department.

Hector Cuellar, 1033 Davidson Lane, Shreveport, public intoxication, Dec. 25.

Shawn Anthony Coco, 8169 Sundown Dr., Morringsport, LA, failure to maintain financial responsibility (third or more)(twice), driving while license invalid and Harrison County warrant, Dec. 26.

Cynthia Yvonne Murarah, 2704 Holland St., theft over $500 and less than $1,500, Dec. 27.

Joseph James Allen ,2200 Kings Road, driving while license invalid, Dec. 28.

Jovan Jerrell Whitehead, 2009 E. Grand Ave., unlawfully carrying weapon, Dec.27.

Ashley Nicole Ray, 250 Hillcrest Dr., Jefferson, Harrison County warrant, Dec. 28.

Patrick Bouvier Dunn, 1203 Sanford St., no valid driver’s license (twice), failure to maintain financial responsibility and expired motor vehicle inspection.

Incidents reported by City of Marshall Police Department.

Burglary Motor Vehicles (parts/accessories): Burglary was reported at 3001 University Ave. Dec. 24.

Burglary (residential, unlawful, no force): A burglary was reported at 2306 Homes Road, Dec. 25.

Criminal mischief class B greater than $50: Criminal mischief was reported at 305 Parker St., Dec. 25.

Criminal mischief class B greater than $50: Criminal mischief was reported at Addibelle/Joyce Dec. 26.

Organized retail theft less than $50: Retail theft was reported at 1506 W. Grand Ave. Dec. 26.

Burglary (residential – unlawful ): Burglary was reported at 1504 E. Fannin St. Dec. 27.

Theft (all other, under $50): A theft was reported at 304 W. Pinecrest Dr., Dec. 27.

Violation of Protective Order: A violation of a protective order at 2411 Fair St. Dec. 27.

Criminal mischief: Criminal mischief was reported at 1006 Leona St. Dec. 27.

Criminal mischief, Class A, greater than $500: Criminal mischief was reported at 3200 Elysian Fields Ave. Dec. 28.

Arrests by Texas Dept. of Public Safety.

Melissa Suzanne Dinkins, 66 Shirley Rose Road, Haughton, LA., Upshur County/MTR/Assault causes bodily injury, Dec. 24.

Jacob Curtis Bowman, 402 Williow Road, Hallsville, driving while license invalid with previous conviction/suspension without financial resolution, possession or delivery of drug paraphernalia, Dec. 24.

Anita Maria Garrett, 1033 Davidson, Shreveport, driving while intoxicated, Dec. 24.

Mariano Saucedo Espinosa, 4005 Wesley St., Longview, driving while intoxicated (first), open container in vehicle, Dec. 25.

Ethel Lavette Stafford, 261 Jay St., Karnack, cpf/failed to maintain financial responsibility (2), driving while license invalid.

Beverly Monique Vaughn, 312 Walter St., Longview, Gregg County/rop/theft property with previous conviction, expired Department of Transportation inspection certificated, speeding, Dec. 26.

Reginald Lamar Chilton, 14354 Hwy. 110, Tyler, parole violation, Dec. 26.

Mary Fay Waholf, 1313 W. Marshall Ave., Longview, driving while license invalid with previous conviction/suspension/without financial resolution, Dec. 26.

Arrests by the Harrison County Sheriff’s Office.

Orlando Jamar Gipson, 153 Earl Davis, Ferriday, LA, vop/possession of marijuana. Dec. 24.

Susan Rachel Roy, 4306 Shildbrook Dr., Austin, Marion County/mtr/manufacturing/delivery controlled substance, Dec. 26.

Article source: http://www.marshallnewsmessenger.com/news/police/scottsville-residents-report-identity-theft/article_361ef2d2-b2b2-53e6-9962-ad7309b668d1.html

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Make Protecting Yourself From Identity Theft A New Year’s Resolution

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014



Tips to protect yourself from identity theft.

TOPEKA, Kansas (WIBW) — By Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt

As the new year arrives, it is the time that many of us will sit down and set a few goals and resolutions for ourselves. One of those resolutions should be to take some simple steps to protect yourself from identity theft.

Identity theft is one of the top complaints our office receives every year, and the numbers are growing. Thieves can steal your identity in any number of ways – both high-tech and low-tech. They could have gotten your information in one of the well-publicized computer security hacks of the past year. Or maybe they just dug through your trash and found an old credit card bill or bank statement.

When your identity is stolen, it can take months – or even years – to put the pieces of your financial life back together. Our consumer protection team will be there to help if that happens, but there are also a few simple steps you can take to avoid becoming a victim.

1. Regularly change your passwords to all online banking and other accounts that may contain personal identifying information, including your email. The new year is a good time to review your passwords and decide which ones might need to be changed.

2. Never provide personal financial information, including your Social Security number, account numbers or passwords, over the phone or the Internet if you did not initiate the contact.

3. Never click on a link provided in an e-mail you believe is fraudulent.

4. Don’t be intimidated by an e-mail or caller who suggests dire consequences if you do not immediately provide or verify financial information.

5. If you believe the contact may be legitimate, contact the financial institution yourself. You can find phone numbers and Web sites on the monthly statements you receive from your financial institution, or you can look the company up in a phone book or on the Internet and contact them directly. To contact your credit card company, call the customer service number printed on the back of the card.

6. Review account statements regularly to ensure all charges are correct. If your account statement is late in arriving, call your financial institution to find out why. If your financial institution offers electronic account access, periodically review activity online to catch suspicious activity.

7. Securely destroy old personal documents you no longer need to keep. Use a paper shredder or take your documents to a secure document disposal company. Many banks offer this service to their customers – and our office will be offering opportunities later this spring during National Consumer Protection Week. Watch our website at www.InYourCornerKansas.org for more information on upcoming events.

If you do fall victim to identity theft, you may file a report with our office by visiting our consumer protection website at www.InYourCornerKansas.org or call (800) 432-2310.

Article source: http://www.wibw.com/home/headlines/Make-Protecting-Yourself-From-Identity-Theft-A-New-Years-Resolution-287108971.html

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Prilock Internet Security Training Reduces Chances of Hacking and Identity Theft

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

SAN DIEGO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Prilock Security, an innovator in online security awareness training,
announced today the immediate availability of its game-changing,
Internet-based security awareness program to consumers. While identity
protection companies are a good defense strategy, they only notify
people after an event has occurred and can’t monitor all financial
accounts. Firewalls and antivirus programs are easily bypassed as
evidenced by the flurry of successful attacks. Prilock shows people how
to use the Internet, email, and social media safely – greatly reducing
their visibility and vulnerability to identity theft and other malicious
attacks.

Every day, the average person unintentionally leaves a trail of logins,
passwords, Instagram and Facebook posts, tweets, texts, and blog
comments across the Internet that all lead directly back to them.
Searching the Internet for work or leisure, banking online or even
sending emails to friends or colleagues is enough to expose individuals
and businesses to catastrophic consequences.

“Prilock shows how the attacks are built and the psychology used to
trick and con user’s everyday…Without the Tech Talk,” said Dan Hirning,
CEO of Prilock. “Once you’ve seen an attack assembled – you know how to
spot them, now and in the future. This is the most effective way for
users to protect themselves from hacker’s tricks, phishing scams, social
engineering, and online predators. Prilock users also receive the latest
scam and new attack alerts as discovered.”

Prilock’s online security awareness is designed for all user experience
levels from beginning to expert. The one-hour interactive briefing is
perfect for anyone who uses a smartphone, laptop, or public Wi-Fi. Users
learn how cybercrime works and why everyone is a target. The
easy-to-follow lessons are reinforced with Prilock’s Hacker Challenge
game, where a hacker attempts to steal users ID, cash, and retirement
accounts. Prilock offers Gift Cards allowing people to send them to
friends, clients, or loved ones to help secure their online activities
from hacker’s tricks.

For a limited time, Prilock is offering 50% off its 1-year security
awareness training. For more information visit. www.prilock.com

About Prilock

Prilock provides professional online security education to small and
medium size businesses and is the first to offer this training directly
to individuals. Prilock’s team has extensive experience securing
commercial, federal, military and classified networks from cyber
criminals.

Article source: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20141229005060/en/Prilock-Internet-Security-Training-Reduces-Chances-Hacking

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China Grove man charged with ID theft

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

Authorities say a China Grove man was charged after taking a debit card from a longtime friend and using it to pay his own car insurance.

The Rowan County Sheriff’s Office charged Steven Marable Kluttz with felony identity theft. Kluttz remains in the Rowan County Detention Center under a $5,000 secured bond.

Kluttz, 48, of Central Avenue, is the brother of China Grove Police Chief Eddie Kluttz. The chief declined to comment.

The victim, an 81-year-old man, told authorities he’s been friends with Steven Kluttz for about 15 to 20 years and the man had been at his home on occasion. A report said Kluttz denied involvement, but upon a second interview with authorities he said he’d taken money to make five insurance payments.

A report said Kluttz had gotten insurance through Dairyland Auto Insurance, a policy he established July 16 by phone.

Kluttz told authorities he’d go from time to time with the victim to the ATM so the victim could withdraw money from his own account. However, the victim said he didn’t recall making five withdrawals from his account.

The victim filed a report to law enforcement Nov. 28, officials said.

Kluttz was convicted in 2003 of driving while license revoked and possession of drug paraphernalia in 2002. Both offenses are misdemeanors.

Steven Kluttz has two other pending 2014 cases in Rowan County courts including hit and run leaving the scene of an accident where there was property damage and driving while impaired.

Contact reporter Shavonne Walker at 704-797-4253.

 

 

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Article source: http://www.salisburypost.com/2014/12/30/china-grove-man-charged-with-id-theft/

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Are You Doing All You Can to Prevent Identity Theft?

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014
Identity theft
Alamy/Brian Jackson

Identity theft is raging across the Internet. But one company wants to put out the fire.

It playfully calls itself Credit Sesame, but this company has a serious mission. In cooperation with other members of the nonprofit The Identity Theft Council, Credit Sesame is promoting a nationwide initiative dubbed “100 Cities in 100 Days.” Through it, Credit Sesame and its partners aim to educate consumers about the risks of identity theft, and gather together in one place the best ideas for how to stop it.

To this end, Credit Sesame and the Council this month began distributing a free pamphlet. They’re making it available to the public in hopes of convincing at least “100 cities” across the nation to set up programs to educate consumers about ID theft. They also hope city governments will begin cooperating with one another to codify some best practices to combat the threat.

How Bad Is the Problem?

“Last year, 13.1 million consumers suffered identity fraud and the problem continues to grow,” says Credit Sesame CEO Adrian Nazari in the pamphlet. Credit Sesame expects 2014 to end with 16 million Americans affected by ID theft — with one new victim created every three seconds. Identity theft is now the No. 1 consumer complaint in America, says the Council — as it has been for the past 14 years.

What Do the Thieves Want?

For the most part: money. You’ve got it; they want it. Identity thieves want to steal your digital identity and use it to take out credit cards and other loans in your name, or to sign up for utilities services when their own poor credit histories might make it difficult for them to get approved. They’d like to charge their purchases to your credit cards. Make withdrawals from your bank accounts. And have your IRS tax refunds sent to them instead. And that’s just for starters.

Among other factoids described in the Council’s Think Security First! pamphlet is the observation that the street value of your Social Security number could be greater than that of your flat-screen TV. What’s more, on the black market for confidential data in general, criminals pay as much as 30 times more for private medical information than for financial information.

How Can You Keep Thieves From Getting What They Want?

If you’ve spent any time at all here on DailyFinance, you’re familiar with the basics of how to avoid getting taken in by Internet scams, guard your credit data when shopping, and stymie ID thieves’ efforts — but it never hurts to review these basics.

Here, then, is just a small sampling of the first steps the Council, Credit Sesame, and privacy experts in general recommend you take to protect yourself from ID theft:

  • Read your mail. The world’s gone digital, but for the time being, the USPS is still in business — and still delivering a treasure trove of credit card applications, medical bills, and Social Security statements to your mailbox. Read them when they arrive to minimize the time between when you’re victimized by fraud and when you find out.
  • Then shred your mail. Recycling paper products is great for the environment. But when you put sensitive documents on the curb intact, you’re inviting trouble. So shred first — and then recycle.
  • Read your email, too. These days, lots of us get our bank statements and bills over the Internet — and pay our bills with online bill pay. It’s convenient, and it also lets you instantly check on the status of your bank and credit card accounts, to see if there’s any hanky-panky going on. But only if you do it. Without the prompt of an envelope arriving in your snail-mailbox, you’re going to have to remember to check on these things yourself. Daily if possible, say some experts. Weekly if not. But at least once a month.
  • Protect your email (and Web browsing, and computer files). This may seem daunting to the not-technologically-inclined. But you can get a good start with just three simple steps: (1) Think up at least one strong password — consisting of numbers, symbols, upper- and lowercase letters — and use it. (2) Install a good antivirus and anti-spyware program on your home computer. (3) Install one on your smartphone as well.

Final point: If all of the above seems like too much work to you, feel free to outsource. Credit Sesame itself offers a free credit monitoring service. And in the Think Security First! pamphlet, you’ll find info on free services such as Dashlane and LastPass that will manage your passwords for you, recommendations for free antivirus software programs, and even a tip on a good program to lock down your smartphone.

And a whole lot more.

Motley Fool contributor Rich Smith was pleased to learn from the pamphlet that his Internet password — “PASSWORD123” — is currently the most popular password on the Internet! (Yes! We’re No. 1!) Neither he, nor The Motley Fool, has any financial interest in any companies mentioned above. Is your portfolio ready for the new year? Check out our free report on one great stock to buy for 2015 and beyond.

Article source: http://www.dailyfinance.com/2014/12/30/prevent-identity-theft/

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Prilock Internet Security Training Reduces Chances of Hacking and Identity Theft

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014


Prilock Internet Security Training Reduces Chances of Hacking and Identity Theft Prilock Security, an innovator in online security awareness training,
announced today the immediate availability of its game-changing,
Internet-based security awareness program to consumers. While identity
protection companies are a good defense strategy, they only notify
people after an event has occurred and can’t monitor all financial
accounts. Firewalls and antivirus programs are easily bypassed as
evidenced by the flurry of successful attacks. Prilock shows people how
to use the Internet, email, and social media safely – greatly reducing
their visibility and vulnerability to identity theft and other malicious
attacks.

Every day, the average person unintentionally leaves a trail of logins,
passwords, Instagram and Facebook posts, tweets, texts, and blog
comments across the Internet that all lead directly back to them.
Searching the Internet for work or leisure, banking online or even
sending emails to friends or colleagues is enough to expose individuals
and businesses to catastrophic consequences.

“Prilock shows how the attacks are built and the psychology used to
trick and con user’s everyday…Without the Tech Talk,” said Dan Hirning,
CEO of Prilock. “Once you’ve seen an attack assembled – you know how to
spot them, now and in the future. This is the most effective way for
users to protect themselves from hacker’s tricks, phishing scams, social
engineering, and online predators. Prilock users also receive the latest
scam and new attack alerts as discovered.”

Prilock’s online security awareness is designed for all user experience
levels from beginning to expert. The one-hour interactive briefing is
perfect for anyone who uses a smartphone, laptop, or public Wi-Fi. Users
learn how cybercrime works and why everyone is a target. The
easy-to-follow lessons are reinforced with Prilock’s Hacker Challenge
game, where a hacker attempts to steal users ID, cash, and retirement
accounts. Prilock offers Gift Cards allowing people to send them to
friends, clients, or loved ones to help secure their online activities
from hacker’s tricks.

For a limited time, Prilock is offering 50% off its 1-year security
awareness training. For more information visit. www.prilock.com

About Prilock

Prilock provides professional online security education to small and
medium size businesses and is the first to offer this training directly
to individuals. Prilock’s team has extensive experience securing
commercial, federal, military and classified networks from cyber
criminals.

SOURCE: BUSINESS WIRE. ©2014 Business Wire

©2014 Business Wire

Article source: http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwgeeks/article/Prilock-Internet-Security-Training-Reduces-Chances-of-Hacking-and-Identity-Theft-20141229

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