Archive for June, 2014

Crime Stoppers Crime of the Week: Identity Theft

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Police are looking for your help in solving a recent identity theft case that stretched from Abilene to the metroplex. The right information could get you a cash reward.

Abilene police have a surveillance video from a bank in the metroplex area. Bank officers there told Abilene police that the video shows a transaction that was used with the debit card and identification from an Abilene woman.

“We are trying to find out who made this withdrawal,” says Gary Heslep of the Abilene Police Department. “To give us a starting place, we need to find out what was going on.”

Police say they want to speak with the woman in the video as they try to resolve the identity theft case.

“There may be some explanation,” adds Heslep. “They may have been duped or something, but the first thing we have to do is find out who it is.”

To provide anonymous information, visit AbileneCrimeStoppers.com or by calling 676-TIPS or 676-8477.

Article source: http://www.bigcountryhomepage.com/story/d/story/crime-stoppers-crime-of-the-week-identity-theft/18255/6GNKmJo82E-shMjFXGYYFA

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Butler University warns of identity theft risk – WISH

Monday, June 30th, 2014

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – Leaders at Butler University have drafted a letter warning recipients of a possible breach of personal information.

In the notification letter obtained by 24-Hour News 8, the school’s president Jim Danko wrote that the university was contacted by authorities in California on May 28, 2014. Investigators alerted Butler that they had a suspect in custody who had a flash drive holding personal information of certain university employees.

Through an internal investigation, Butler officials discovered someone hacked the school’s network sometime between November 2013 and May 2014, the letter stated.

“Third-party computer forensics experts were retained by Butler University to confirm these findings and to identify the full extent of data potentially exposed as a result of this incident,” Danko wrote.

According to the school, the hacker(s) had access to files containing names, dates of birth, Social Security numbers and driver’s license numbers.

Butler has offered resources to people who think their personal information may have been compromised. The letter included an activation code to sign up for a complimentary membership to a fraud protection service called Experian. The code must be used by September 30, 2014. Butler has also established an assistance phone line staffed by professionals trained in identity protection and restoration, Danko said.

The assistance line could be reached Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. A reference number of 8867061014 should be used when calling 888-414-8021.

 

Article source: http://wishtv.com/2014/06/30/butler-university-warns-of-identity-theft-risk/

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Jim Miller: How to protect yourself from identity theft

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Dear Savvy Senior,

I just turned 65 and received my Medicare card. I see that the ID number on my card is the same as my Social Security number, and on the back of the card it tells me I need to carry it with me at all times. What can I do to protect myself from identify theft if my purse and Medicare card get stolen?

Conflicted Beneficiary

Dear Conflicted,

Many people new to Medicare are surprised to learn that the ID number on their Medicare card is identical to their Social Security number (SSN). After all, we’re constantly warned not to carry our SSN around with us, because if it gets lost or stolen, the result could be identity theft.

But the Medicare ID is more than an identifier. It’s proof of insurance. Beneficiaries need to show their Medicare card at the doctor’s office and the hospital in order to have Medicare pay for treatment.

Over the years, many consumer advocates have called for a new form of Medicare identification. The Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services, which administers Medicare, also acknowledges the problem, but so far nothing has been done.

One of the main reasons is because it would cost an estimated $255 to $317 million to fix it. And that’s just the direct cost to the federal government. It doesn’t include the expense for physicians and other health care providers to adjust their systems, or the cost to the states.

Other government health systems, like the Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense, already have begun using ID numbers that are different from SSNs, but no one knows when Medicare will follow suit.

In the meantime, here are some tips offered by various consumer advocate groups that can help keep your Medicare card safe and out of the hands of fraudsters.

Protect your card

For starters, AARP suggests that you simply don’t carry your Medicare card at all, because it’s not necessary. Most healthcare providers already have their patients in their electronic systems and know how to bill you.

But if you really don’t feel comfortable not having it with you, then the Privacy Rights Clearing House, a national consumer resource on identity theft, recommends that you make a photocopy of your card and cut it down to wallet size. Then use scissors to cut out the last four digits of your SSN, or take a black marker and cross them out, and carry that instead.

You will, however, need your actual Medicare card with you the first time you visit a new health care provider, who will likely want to make a photocopy of it for their files.

If you’re worried that you’ll need your card in an emergency situation in order to get care, you should know that emergency personnel cannot refuse you care until you show an insurance card. Although you’ll need to come up with billing information before leaving a hospital, that doesn’t mean you won’t receive care.

Lost or stolen cards

If your Medicare card is lost or stolen, you can replace it by calling Social Security at (800) 772-1213. You also can apply for a new card online at ssa.gov/medicarecard or go to your local Social Security office.

If your Medicare card has been lost or stolen, you will need to watch out for Medicare fraud. You can do this by checking your quarterly Medicare summary notices for services or supplies you did not receive. If you spot anything suspicious or wrong, call the Inspector General’s fraud hotline at (800) 447-8477.

If you need help identifying Medicare fraud, contact your state Senior Medicare Patrol program. See smpresource.org or call (877) 808-2468 for contact information.

Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.

Article source: http://www.baxterbulletin.com/story/news/local/2014/06/29/jim-miller-protect-identity-theft/11706477/

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Credit monitoring just one component of ID-theft protection

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Wearing a helmet on a motorcycle protects the head but leaves the rest of body unprotected. Those who sell helmets only promise protection for the head — and we expect no more.

But with credit monitoring, it seems the industry’s marketing messages too often lull consumers into a false sense of security, believing that credit monitoring will fully protect them from ID theft. It won’t.

Data breaches at Target, eBay, ATT and most recently PF Chang’s – along with the fear of identity theft — have dramatically increased demand for credit monitoring. Yet, mounds of research and complaints make it clear that credit monitoring is just one component of a comprehensive ID-theft product solution.

With a false sense of security, consumers may let their guard down or never look at other very critical and vulnerable ID-theft risks. The Federal Trade Commission Consumer Sentinel report says that nearly 80 percent — a whopping four of five identity-theft claims — would not have been prevented and/or the consumer alerted by credit monitoring.

Credit monitoring services offer alerts about potential fraudulent actions with debit and credit cards, loans and similar financial activities — after the fact. Monitoring alerts are beneficial, but like motorcycle helmets, are very limited in protection. The stealing of passports, driver’s licenses, employee IDs, health-insurance numbers, government benefits, e-mail addresses, login, passwords and other personal information won’t be prevented or helped by credit monitoring.

Consumers do need to be aware of fraudulent financial events, and credit-monitoring services can help ensure timely awareness and a quick response by the potential ID-theft victim. All credit monitoring is not created equal. For example, some monitoring services provide single- bureau monitoring; others provide three-bureau monitoring. Each bureau’s reports are different.

Evidence that credit monitoring is overwhelmingly reactive and extremely limited at prevention is well documented. ID-theft is at an all time high even as purchases of credit monitoring are also at an all-time high. There were a record 13.1 million identity-theft victims in 2013. That’s up from 12.5 million in 2012, according to Javelin’s 2014 Strategy and Research Identity Fraud Report. If credit monitoring works as “advertised,” why are there more victims of identity-theft than ever?

Over the past three years the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has fined banks and credit-card companies $2 billion, including big names such as American Express, Bank of America, Capitol One, Chase Bank, Citigroup and Wells Fargo. The CFPB determined that their selling practices of pressuring cardholders to buy expensive “protective” products such as credit monitoring were dishonest and illegal. This enforcement has resulted in marketing changes that aren’t as likely to fool or coerce consumers into buying the very limited benefits of credit monitoring.

Mark’s most important: Buyer beware. Make your decision about purchasing credit-monitoring services based on facts, not questionable advertising or fear tactics.

Mark Pribish is vice president and ID-theft practice leader at Merchants Information Solutions Inc., a national ID-theft and background-screening provider based in Phoenix. Reach him at markpribish@merchantsinfo.com.

Article source: http://www.azcentral.com/story/money/business/2014/06/26/credit-monitoring-just-one-component-theft-protection/11427803/

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How to protect your Medicare card from identity theft

Sunday, June 29th, 2014

June 28, 2014

How to protect your Medicare card from identity theft


Jim Miller



The Clinton Herald
The Clinton Herald


Sat Jun 28, 2014, 09:58 AM CDT

DEAR SAVVY SENIOR: I just turned 65 and received my Medicare card. I see that the ID number on my card is the same as my Social Security number, and on the back of the card it tells me I need to carry it with me at all times. What can I do to protect myself from identify theft if my purse and Medicare card get stolen? — Conflicted Beneficiary

DEAR CONFLICTED: Many people new to Medicare are surprised to learn that the ID number on their Medicare card is identical to their Social Security number (SSN). After all, we’re constantly warned not to carry our SSN around with us, because if it gets lost or stolen, the result could be identity theft.

But the Medicare ID is more than an identifier. It’s proof of insurance. Beneficiaries need to show their Medicare card at the doctor’s office and the hospital in order to have Medicare pay for treatment.

Over the years, many consumer advocates, have called for a new form of Medicare identification. The Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services, which administers Medicare, also acknowledges the problem, but so far nothing has been done.

One of the main reasons is because it would cost an estimated $255 to $317 million to fix it. And that’s just the direct cost to the federal government. It doesn’t include the expense for physicians and other healthcare providers to adjust their systems, or the cost to the states.

Other government health systems like the Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense have already begun using ID numbers that are different from SSNs, but no one knows when Medicare will follow suit.

In the meantime, here are some tips offered by various consumer advocate groups that can help keep your Medicare card safe and out of the hands of fraudsters.

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Article source: http://www.clintonherald.com/lifestyles/x1927828119/How-to-protect-your-Medicare-card-from-identity-theft

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DPH investigating cases of identity theft and tax fraud – Selma Times

Sunday, June 29th, 2014

DPH investigating cases of identity theft and tax fraud

Published 6:13pm Saturday, June 28, 2014

By Scottie Brown

The Selma Times-Journal

The Alabama Department of Public Health is currently investigating a string of identity thefts and false tax returns filed for the years 2011 and 2012.

Samarria Dunson, the privacy officer for the ADPH, said those concerned they are victims of identity theft or tax returns filed in their name should contact the fraud department of Equifax, Experian or TransUnion Credit Bureau to receive the proper proof of stolen identity.

“They don’t need to just fill out that form and send it to the U.S. Attorney’s office. They need to provide that supporting information as well, to say ‘Hey, this is my proof to show that I had a false tax return filed in my name and this my proof that it’s accurate.’”

Individuals affected by the identity theft and falsely filed tax returns should fill out the corresponding forms found on the Department of Justice’s website and ADPH’s website.

The forms and documentation should be sent to the U.S. Attorney’s Office on or before July 31.

The information compromised during the thefts included names, date of births and in some cases social security numbers, Dunson said. Dunson stressed medical diagnosis information or particular reasons for a patient’s visit were not compromised.

“The system that they got the information from doesn’t even have the diagnosis in it, so we know that they didn’t get that information,” Dunson said.

Because a majority of those affected were born in 1995 and 1996, Dunson said the ADPH had put the information not only on the ADPH website, but also social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter.

“We’ll continue to push that out through those two social media sources,” Dunson said.

“We just want to try and put it in their face as much as possible. We’ll be continuing to do that for a minimum of 90 days.”

Lt. Curtis Muhannad, who deals with fraud for the Selma Police Department, said it was important for those who believed they were victims of identity theft to notify the police department or Dallas County Sheriff’s Department.

“If they find out their identity has been stolen or believe that their identity has been stolen they need to notify the local law firm agency,” Muhannad said. “If they have any documents in reference to the identity theft they need to make copies of those documents and provide them to the investigating officer in reference to the case.”

Identity theft is a Class C Felony in Alabama, and Muhannad said the police department takes it very seriously.

“We use all our resources in identifying the person who has stolen a person’s identity, and we do everything we can to bring that person to justice,” Muhannad said.

Dunson said the ADPH had taken steps to restrict access to their databases since investigation began in early June.

“If you’re working for a health care entity and you need access to these databases in order to do your work that’s just kind of the nature of the healthcare industry, however, we have definitely restricted access in every way that we can just to make our databases less attractive to these types of thieves,” Dunson said.

Article source: http://www.selmatimesjournal.com/2014/06/28/dph-investigating-cases-of-identity-theft-and-tax-fraud/

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ID-theft laws may be vulnerable in court

Sunday, June 29th, 2014

The state identity-theft laws challenged in last week’s federal lawsuit against Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio and others have been challenged previously by defense attorneys in court. Those initial results, attorneys say, are promising.

The two state laws in question, “taking identity of another person or entity” and “aggravated taking identity of another person or entity,” are frequently cited as the legal backing behind Arpaio’s workplace raids.

The suit alleges that the statutes, while purporting to enforce all varieties of identity theft, are thinly veiled mechanisms used to promote a broader, anti-immigration agenda.

Arpaio defends his practices and maintains that his investigations target identity thieves regardless of their immigration status.

Since its inception in 2008, the Sheriff’s Criminal Employment Squad has arrested and booked over 780 suspects for charges related to forgery and identity theft.

The vast majority of those arrested under the ID theft laws, through Arpaio’s workplace investigations or otherwise, were convicted, according to data from the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office.

In a sample of 2,500 cases, some of which include more than one defendant, only six defendants were acquitted after going to trial.

Most will ultimately accept a prosecutor’s deal and plead guilty, either to the charged Class 3 or Class 4 felonies or to a lesser charge, such as Class 6 felony criminal impersonation, said Ray Ybarra Maldonado, the local plaintiffs’ attorney on the lawsuit.

He said the standard sentencing agreement is 90 days in jail, a felony record and probation.

It’s a tempting offer, Ybarra Maldonado said, given that the alternative requires defendants to wait out their trials behind bars.

Under Arizona’s Proposition 100, those who are in the country illegally are not eligible for bail if they are accused of a “serious” felony, classified as a Class 4 felony or lower.

“It’s essentially a deal, because if you want to take your case to trial, you’re probably going to be sitting in Arpaio’s jail for more than 90 days,” Ybarra Maldonado said.

But felony records may create a virtually impenetrable barrier for an undocumented immigrant to obtain the legal right to live and work in the U.S.

It was for this reason that Miguel Angel Morales-Sedano, a father and husband of a U.S. citizen, decided instead to take his chances with a jury.

He was charged with identity theft and forgery after a Sept. 27, 2012, raid at United Construction Group in Glendale.

Ybarra Maldonado represented Morales-Sedano in that case and filed a motion to dismiss the charges based on pre-emption of the federal government.

“The state of Arizona has simply created a mechanism by which they can arrest, detain and prosecute undocumented individuals for ‘working illegally’ in the country,” the motion stated. “Such actions are the exclusive domain of the federal government.”

The case went to trial, and a jury found Morales-Sedano not guilty based on reasonable doubt that he was the one who provided the false documentation.

The judge’s and jury’s responses to the state’s case emboldenedYbarra Maldonado and others to take these arguments on pre-emption a step further.

Plaintiffs in the suit are grassroots human-rights organization Puente Arizona, two women arrested and convicted of felony identity theft and Reverend Susan E. Frederick-Gray, a Maricopa County taxpayer who says enforcement of these statutes is an illegal expenditure of county dollars.

Along with Arpaio, County Attorney Bill Montgomery, Maricopa County and Arizona Department of Public Safety Director Robert Halliday, are named as defendants in the lawsuit.

QA about the new ID-theft lawsuit

Question: What will happen if the plaintiffs are successful?

Answer: The plaintiffs are asking for a permanent injunction that would prohibit Maricopa County from further enforcing the two named ID-theft laws, and a permanent injunction prohibiting Maricopa County from using documents associated with employment verification as a basis for law-enforcement efforts.

Essentially, the state could no longer enforce the ID-theft laws commonly used in workplace raids. The suit also asks that a judge order the defendants to expunge the records of the two plaintiffs who were convicted under these laws.

Q: I am using a fictitious Social Security number for my employment. Can I still be arrested?

A: Yes. Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio pledged in a recent news conference to continue to enforce the state laws against identity theft. Under the current statute, using a false Social Security number, whether it is attached to a real or a fictitious person, is a felony.

Q: I have been convicted under one of these laws. If the plaintiffs are successful, does this mean my convictions will be vacated?

A: Probably not automatically, saidRay Ybarra Maldonado, the local plaintiffs’ attorney on the lawsuit. “They would have to file some sort of motion to vacate, using our victory as a legal precedent,” he said.

Q: What if I pleaded to a lesser charge?

A: This will probably not affect those who pleaded to a lesser charge,Ybarra Maldonado said.

Q: Could Arpaio still conduct workplace raids based on forgery charges?

A: “That’s going to be up to how broad the ruling is from the district court,” Ybarra Maldonado said. In an interview, Arpaio said he would continue to enforce state forgery laws.

Q: Does this mean that I could still be arrested and charged by the federal government?

A: “Without a doubt,” Ybarra Maldonado said. “This is not a challenge for the federal government’s authority to do what Congress tells them they can do.” However, he noted that federal workplace raids are significantly less frequent and tend to go after employers, rather than the employees.

“It’s not by any means an approval of the federal government doing these raids, but it is pretty telling that what the state government does is the exact opposite of what the federal government does,” Ybarra Maldonado said.

Q: I’m currently using a fake ID to buy alcohol. Will this affect me?

A: No. “There’s a specific statute going toward those minors, and they aren’t being addressed at all in the lawsuit,” Ybarra Maldonado said.

Q: After an ID-theft conviction, I am on a priority list for removal from the country by Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE). If this lawsuit is successful, will this remove me from the list or place me lower on it?

A: Plaintiff’s attorneys are hopeful that this would be the case, but history hasn’t proved promising, Ybarra Maldonado said.

After the plaintiff’s recent victory in a racial-profiling lawsuit against the Sheriff’s Office, attorneys attempted to use this as an argument to curb prioritized deportations.

“ICE just kind of seemed to ignore that argument,” Ybarra Maldonado said.

ICE officials do not comment on pending litigation.

Article source: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/arizona/2014/06/29/id-theft-laws-court/11699123/

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How to protect your ID while on vacation

Sunday, June 29th, 2014

COSTA MESA, Calif. — The summer travel season is here with high expectations for fun and lasting memories, but vacations can turn into nightmares as travelers try to unravel the damages of identity theft. A new survey conducted by Edelman Berland for Experian’s ProtectMyID® reveals that 30 percent of travelers have experienced identity theft while traveling or know someone who has. Results show that recovery takes time – more than a week in some instances.
 
“The last thing people want is for their trip to fund an identity thief’s vacation,” said Becky Frost, senior manager of consumer education for Experian’s ProtectMyID. “Identity theft can derail vacations quickly, but taking some precautions before and during travel can help consumers protect themselves.”

Traveling troubled waters
Nearly one in five travelers reports having sensitive information lost or stolen, and 30 percent said they experienced identity theft while traveling or know someone who has. Those affected by identity theft report the fraud impacted their travel experience. Three in 10 victims say that it took more than a week to resolve the issues caused by identity theft.

Flying by the seat of their pants
Most travelers check for signs of identity fraud after traveling but fail to take proactive precautions before and during their trips.

  • Only 39 percent of travelers alert their debit/credit card providers before departing, and only 33 percent notify their bank
  • Just one in three travelers use passwords to protect their smartphones
  • Thirty-five percent of travelers use hotel safes to store sensitive information
  • More than a quarter (27 percent) of people bring their Social Security card with them while traveling
  • Twenty percent of vacationers say they do not feel vulnerable to identity theft while traveling
  • Ninety-two percent carry credit cards or debit cards while traveling, yet more than half (52 percent) are unaware of their card’s liability limit if lost or stolen
  • Women and seniors (adults ages 65 or older) are most likely to take precautions to protect their identities before, during and after traveling

Identity theft hotspots
Consumers have misconceptions about where identity theft occurs.

  • Among those who have been victimized personally while traveling, 10 percent do not know where their identity was stolen
  • Travelers indicated that they feel most vulnerable to identity theft in restaurants (19 percent), Internet cafés (15 percent), hotels (14 percent) and airports (14 percent)
  • Actual numbers show that the highest vulnerabilities occur in hotels (24 percent), restaurants (18 percent), airports (12 percent), taxis (8 percent) and car rental offices (8 percent)

Safe harbor
Taking certain steps can help reduce the risk of identity theft while traveling.

 

  • Password-protect smartphones and other electronic devices
  • Create strong passwords with a mix of uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers and symbols on sensitive accounts accessible through electronic devices
  • Avoid public Wi-Fi when possible; create your own Wi-Fi with a portable router and SIM card
  • Delay social media posts that indicate you’re out of town; wait until you’re back from your trip to share your travel adventures
  • Choose to pay with a credit card versus debit card; credit cards often offer better fraud protection
  • Bank at the branch – ATMs in high-traffic tourist areas may put you at risk for skimming
  • Alert your bank of your travel plans to avoid account holds and hassles
  • Avoid traveling with unnecessary documents, such as Social Security cards or unneeded credit cards
  • Disable geotagging on all cameras

To learn more about the survey, please visit http://bit.ly/ProtectMyIDTravelReport. An infographic featuring digital travel tips is available at http://bit.ly/TravelInfographic.

About the survey
This survey was conducted online by Edelman Berland on behalf of Experian from June 2, 2014, through June 5, 2014, among 1,000 adults ages 18 years and older residing throughout the United States. The national study focused on issues related to identity theft and identity protection while traveling. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.1 percent.

About Experian’s ProtectMyID
ProtectMyID is a leading, full-service provider of identity theft detection, protection and resolution. ProtectMyID offers comprehensive identity theft protection features supported by experienced identity theft resolution professionals who deliver personal attention that customers can rely on. ProtectMyID.com® is a Website owned by ConsumerInfo.com, Inc., an Experian company. For more information about how ProtectMyID helps consumers protect themselves against identity theft, please visit http://www.protectmyid.com.

This press release is provided for general guidance and information. It is not intended as, nor should it be construed to be legal, financial or other professional advice. Please consult with your attorney or financial advisor to discuss any legal issues or financial issues involved with credit decisions.

About Experian
Experian® is a leading global information services company, providing data and analytical tools to clients around the world. The Group helps businesses to manage credit risk, prevent fraud, target marketing offers and automate decision making. Experian also helps individuals to check their credit report and credit score, and protect against identity theft.

Experian plc is listed on the London Stock Exchange (EXPN) and is a constituent of the FTSE 100 index. Total revenue for the year ended March 31, 2014, was US$4.8 billion. Experian employs approximately 16,000 people in 39 countries and has its corporate headquarters in Dublin, Ireland, with operational headquarters in Nottingham, UK; California, US; and São Paulo, Brazil.

 

Article source: http://www.azfamily.com/good-morning-arizona/protect-your-id-on-vacation--264745201.html

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Dothan Man Charged with Identity Theft

Sunday, June 29th, 2014



   DOTHAN, Ala. (AP) -- Authorities say a former bail bondsman from Dothan has been indicted in an alleged identity theft scheme.

DOTHAN, Ala. (AP) — Authorities say a former bail bondsman from Dothan has been indicted in an alleged identity theft scheme.

The U.S. Department of Justice said in a news release that an indictment charging Roderick Neal with conspiracy, wire fraud and aggravated identity theft was unsealed Friday. It was not immediately clear whether he had a lawyer.

The indictment says Neal stole personal identifying information and gave it to another person. That person gave it to a third person whom prosecutors say used the identities to file fraudulent tax returns with the Internal Revenue Service and claimed refunds.

The conspiracy charge carries a maximum of 10 years in prison, while wire fraud charge carries a maximum of 20 years in prison and aggravated identity theft carries a maximum of two years in prison.

Article source: http://www.wtvy.com/home/headlines/Dothan-man-charged-with-identity-theft-265050161.html

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Check Your Child’s Credit Report for Identity Theft

Sunday, June 29th, 2014

Check Your Child's Credit Report for Identity Theft

We’ve talked about the importance of protecting yourself against identity theft by credit monitoring, but what about your kids? It’s time to check their report on an annual basis.

Your child’s identity is a prime target for thieves because most parents, and certainly not any children, are expecting the crime. The FTC suggests checking your child’s credit report starting at age 16. This gives parents enough time to correct errors due to theft before they turn 18.

Check the link for tips on how to prevent child identity theft and the warning signs your child’s identity may have been stolen.

Child Identity Theft | FTC via Credit Sesame

Photo by_dinkel_.

Article source: http://lifehacker.com/check-your-childs-credit-report-for-identity-theft-1596914622

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