Archive for June, 2013

Best Steps to Take After ID Theft

Friday, June 28th, 2013

If the potential Rakuten credit card scam has you worried, your fears might not be totally unwarranted. In 2012, 12.6 million people were victims of identity theft, according to a study by Javelin Strategy Research.

Being a victim of identity theft is no small matter. At best, someone gets a hold of your credit card information and uses it to buy some stuff online. At worst, a thief open accounts in your name, makes huge purchases, and racks up a ton of debt before you realize what’s happened. The toll to your credit history can last for years, but there are things you can do to minimize the damage and protect yourself in the future.

Report Your Losses
If you notice strange activity on your credit or debit card, report the charges to your bank immediately using the toll free number on the back of the card or on your statement. The Federal Trade Commission says you aren’t responsible for any charges made on a stolen account number after you report identity theft, so act quickly.

Enact a Fraud Alert
If you find suspicious activity on your accounts, ask one of the credit bureaus to place an initial fraud alert on your credit report. Once you notify one credit bureau, that bureau will notify the others and alerts will appear on all your credit reports. According to the Federal Trade Commission, the alert will remain on your credit report for 90 days. During that time, creditors cannot open new accounts without verifying your information, making it harder for thieves to access your credit. You can file a fraud alert online through Equifax, Experian, or TransUnion.

RELATED: FORGET CREDIT CARDS – SWIPE YOUR FINGER INSTEAD

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Order Your Credit Reports
Start by ordering a copy of all three credit reports. By law, you’re entitled to one free credit report from each credit bureau each year via AnnualCreditReport.com. You’re also entitled to a free credit report after you file an initial fraud alert. Once you have the reports, look for any suspicious activity, like credit inquiries you didn’t make or accounts you didn’t open.

File a Police Report
In all likelihood your local police department won’t be able to help you hunt down identity thieves, but having a police report is a necessary step in creating an identity theft report to present to creditors. Visit your local police station, report the fraud to the authorities, and ask them to include any accounts you know have been victimized for good measure. Ask for a copy of the report and keep it in a safe place.

File an Identity Theft Affidavit
The second part of your identity theft report is an identity theft affidavit, which you can file online through theFTC’s Complaint Assistant site. Visit the site and follow the steps to complete the affidavit. Write down your reference number and print a copy before you close the screen. You won’t be able to access the affidavit later, so you need to print it as soon as you’ve completed it. Make copies of both the police report and the affidavit: these two items make up your identity theft report.

RELATED: 42 MILLION CREDIT REPORTS COULD HAVE ERRORS

Dispute Credit Issues
Using the list of issues gathered from your credit report, you can write a dispute letter to each creditor that reported something fraudulent on your accounts in order to clear your credit. For example, if someone opened a new credit card in your name, write a letter to the creditor disputing the account and ask the creditor to close the account and to remove it from your credit score. Attach your identity theft report as proof and mail the documents through certified mail.

Keep a Record
Start an “identity theft file” to keep track of your progress and keep in it a copy of your credit reports, police report, and identity theft affidavit. You should also include a dated copy of any dispute you send. If you talk to any creditors on the phone, write down the name of the person you spoke to and the time of the call.

Follow Up
By law, your creditors have to respond to your dispute within 30 days and make changes. So after 30 days, order a new copy of your credit reports and check for corrected information. If you still see errors, dispute them with the credit bureaus directly using your identity theft report. Make a new note of the date and follow up again in 30 days.

Update Your Personal Information
While it won’t completely stop future identity theft, change your passwords and PINs that grant access to accounts both on and offline.

Add an Extended Fraud Alert
After 90 days, you can request an extended fraud alert for your credit reports. This alert will remain on your reports for seven years, and keep you off the prescreened offer list for five years, according to the FTC. You’ll also get two free credit reports in the first year. To place an extended alert, call the credit bureaus directly. They may require you to fill out an additional form and mail it in.

Restoring your identity and credit can take a while, but the best thing you can do is act quickly. As soon as you suspect something is amiss, start contacting the credit bureaus and your local police department. The faster you can get them working for you, the faster you can resolve things and get back on track.

This article originally appeared at Dealnews.com.

Article source: http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Articles/2013/06/27/Take-These-Steps-After-ID-Theft.aspx

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Former soldier pleads guilty to Paul Allen ID theft

Friday, June 28th, 2013

PITTSBURGH — A man AWOL from his Army post in Louisiana used a computer at a job center in Pittsburgh to obtain a debit card in the name of billionaire Paul Allen, the co-founder of Microsoft, and attempted to access more than $1.6 million, a federal prosecutor said Thursday.

Brandon Lee Price, 30, of Pittsburgh, pleaded guilty to four counts of bank fraud and must return for sentencing Sept. 30.

Most of the transactions Price attempted did not go through, as they were flagged as suspicious by Citibank, which issued the card. But Price was able to pay $658.81 toward a delinquent Armed Forces Bank loan last year, Assistant U.S. Attorney James Wilson said.

“This case with this high-profile victims calls attention to the seriousness of the crime of identity theft,” U.S. Attorney David Hickton said.

Microsoft did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Citibank spokesman Andrew Brent said that the “security of our customers’ accounts is our top priority” and that measures are in place to protect them.

Price had left his unit without permission at Fort Polk, La., in July 2010 and wasn’t found until the FBI arrested him in Pittsburgh in March 2012. Fort Polk officials did not immediately return a call, but Wilson said after Thursday’s hearing that Price has since been court-martialed and discharged.

In order for Price to plead guilty, Wilson had to detail the evidence for the judge, explaining the scam began when Price called Citibank in late December 2011 and pretended to be Allen.

Price told a customer service representative “he was attempting to do online banking and needed his debit card number” but didn’t have it handy, Wilson said.

Price was able to give the rep the last four digits of Allen’s Social Security number, the last two digits of a debit card account and the entire number for one of Allen’s checking accounts. Despite that, Citibank didn’t give Price the account number he sought, though he did get the number two days later when he called Citibank back and provided additional personal information about Allen.

Price then changed the address on Allen’s account to Price’s home address in Pittsburgh and claiming the card was lost, Citibank sent a replacement to Price’s home.

Price first used the card to make the delinquent loan payment, then attempted several transactions that didn’t go through, including a $1 purchase at a dollar store near his home.

Price also tried to use the card to make three transfers — of $94,000, $800,000 and $130,000 — to accounts he controlled. He also unsuccessfully tried to open an investment account with a $388,000 funds transfer and to purchase $250,000 in certificates of deposit, Wilson said.

FBI agents later determined Price logged onto publicly available computers at a local job center, where he searched for topics including “identity theft,” “brokerage accounts” and “Paul G. Allen.” Wilson said he doesn’t know why the billionaire was targeted.

Both Price and his federal public defender declined to comment.

Bank fraud carries a sentence of up to 30 years in prison, but Price’s case will be governed by guidelines dictated by the amount stolen. The government argues the “loss” is the $1.6 million Price tried to steal, but his attorney contends it’s merely the $658.81 he actually siphoned from Allen’s account.

Article source: http://www.king5.com/news/local/Former-soldier-pleads-guilty-to-Paul-Allen-ID-theft-213401201.html

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Pa. ex-soldier pleads guilty to Microsoft ID theft

Friday, June 28th, 2013

PITTSBURGH —

A man AWOL from his Army post in Louisiana used a computer at a job center in Pittsburgh to obtain a debit card in the name of billionaire Paul Allen, the co-founder of Microsoft, and attempted to access more than $1.6 million, a federal prosecutor said Thursday.

Brandon Lee Price, 30, of Pittsburgh, pleaded guilty to four counts of bank fraud and must return for sentencing Sept. 30.

Most of the transactions Price attempted did not go through, as they were flagged as suspicious by Citibank, which issued the card. But Price was able to pay $658.81 toward a delinquent Armed Forces Bank loan last year, Assistant U.S. Attorney James Wilson said.

“This case with this high-profile victims calls attention to the seriousness of the crime of identity theft,” U.S. Attorney David Hickton said.

Microsoft did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Citibank spokesman Andrew Brent said that the “security of our customers’ accounts is our top priority” and that measures are in place to protect them.

Price had left his unit without permission at Fort Polk, La., in July 2010 and wasn’t found until the FBI arrested him in Pittsburgh in March 2012. Fort Polk officials did not immediately return a call, but Wilson said after Thursday’s hearing that Price has since been court-martialed and discharged.

In order for Price to plead guilty, Wilson had to detail the evidence for the judge, explaining the scam began when Price called Citibank in late December 2011 and pretended to be Allen.

Price told a customer service representative “he was attempting to do online banking and needed his debit card number” but didn’t have it handy, Wilson said.

Price was able to give the rep the last four digits of Allen’s Social Security number, the last two digits of a debit card account and the entire number for one of Allen’s checking accounts. Despite that, Citibank didn’t give Price the account number he sought, though he did get the number two days later when he called Citibank back and provided additional personal information about Allen.

Price then changed the address on Allen’s account to Price’s home address in Pittsburgh and claiming the card was lost, Citibank sent a replacement to Price’s home.

Price first used the card to make the delinquent loan payment, then attempted several transactions that didn’t go through, including a $1 purchase at a dollar store near his home.

Price also tried to use the card to make three transfers – of $94,000, $800,000 and $130,000 – to accounts he controlled. He also unsuccessfully tried to open an investment account with a $388,000 funds transfer and to purchase $250,000 in certificates of deposit, Wilson said.

FBI agents later determined Price logged onto publicly available computers at a local job center, where he searched for topics including “identity theft,” “brokerage accounts” and “Paul G. Allen.” Wilson said he doesn’t know why the billionaire was targeted.

Both Price and his federal public defender declined to comment.

Bank fraud carries a sentence of up to 30 years in prison, but Price’s case will be governed by guidelines dictated by the amount stolen. The government argues the “loss” is the $1.6 million Price tried to steal, but his attorney contends it’s merely the $658.81 he actually siphoned from Allen’s account.

Article source: http://seattletimes.com/html/businesstechnology/2021280883_appamicrosoftcofounderidentitytheft.html

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Pittsburgh soldier to plead to Microsoft identity theft

Friday, June 28th, 2013

An American soldier from Pittsburgh is scheduled to change his not guilty plea to FBI charges that he illegally obtained a credit card using the identity of Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen and tried to use it to make purchases and access cash.

Twenty-nine-year-old Brandon Lee Price was also facing desertion charges because he was missing from his post at Fort Polk, La., when he was arrested on the federal identity theft charges last year.

It’s not immediately clear what happened in the military’s case against Price, but federal criminal court records show he was recently locked down in a psychiatric unit of a Veterans Affairs hospital. That’s why a change of plea hearing scheduled last month was postponed until Thursday.

Price’s federal public defender has a blanket policy of not commenting to the news media.

Article source: http://www.wpxi.com/news/news/local/pittsburgh-soldier-plead-microsoft-identity-theft/nYXYZ/

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Pittsburgh soldier to plead to Microsoft identity theft

Friday, June 28th, 2013

An American soldier from Pittsburgh is scheduled to change his not guilty plea to FBI charges that he illegally obtained a credit card using the identity of Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen and tried to use it to make purchases and access cash.

Twenty-nine-year-old Brandon Lee Price was also facing desertion charges because he was missing from his post at Fort Polk, La., when he was arrested on the federal identity theft charges last year.

It’s not immediately clear what happened in the military’s case against Price, but federal criminal court records show he was recently locked down in a psychiatric unit of a Veterans Affairs hospital. That’s why a change of plea hearing scheduled last month was postponed until Thursday.

Price’s federal public defender has a blanket policy of not commenting to the news media.

Article source: http://www.wpxi.com/news/news/local/pittsburgh-soldier-plead-microsoft-identity-theft/nYXYZ/

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2 Arrested On Identity Theft Charges In Palo Alto

Friday, June 28th, 2013

PALO ALTO (CBS SF) — Palo Alto police arrested two people on suspicion of identity theft on Monday evening, a police officer said.

Officers were dispatched to a Nordstrom store at Stanford Shopping Center located at 180 El Camino Real at 7:54 p.m. on an unrelated police call when the store’s loss prevention called their attention to a man or a woman in the store for suspicious activity, Officer Sean Downey said.

The female suspect first approached a cash register to return an unspecified item and received over $1,000 back, Downey said.

Nordstrom’s policy does not require a customer to have a receipt to make a return, Downey said.

The male suspect then approached another cash register to return an unspecified item but his transaction was denied because loss prevention flagged him for previous frauds at the store, Downey said.

As they were exiting the store police officers stopped the suspects and upon searching them and their silver Mercury Sedan, discovered stolen property including a credit card that was linked to 58-year-old woman from Pinole, Downey said.

They were identified as San Francisco residents Jessica Reed, going under the fake name Tiffany Marie Dunson, 31, and Dwayne Marcel Ross, 38. Both were both booked into the Santa Clara County Main Jail in San Jose.

Reed was arrested on alleged possession of stolen property, possession of paraphernalia, identity theft, possession of controlled substance and burglary.

Dunson was arrested on alleged attempted burglary, possession of stolen property, two counts of identity theft and one count of violating post release community supervision.

An investigation was ongoing as there may be multiple victims, Downey said.

(Copyright 2013 by CBS San Francisco and Bay City News Service. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

 2 Arrested On Identity Theft Charges In Palo Alto

Article source: http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2013/06/27/2-arrested-on-identity-theft-charges-in-palo-alto/

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2 Arrested On Identity Theft Charges In Palo Alto

Friday, June 28th, 2013

PALO ALTO (CBS SF) — Palo Alto police arrested two people on suspicion of identity theft on Monday evening, a police officer said.

Officers were dispatched to a Nordstrom store at Stanford Shopping Center located at 180 El Camino Real at 7:54 p.m. on an unrelated police call when the store’s loss prevention called their attention to a man or a woman in the store for suspicious activity, Officer Sean Downey said.

The female suspect first approached a cash register to return an unspecified item and received over $1,000 back, Downey said.

Nordstrom’s policy does not require a customer to have a receipt to make a return, Downey said.

The male suspect then approached another cash register to return an unspecified item but his transaction was denied because loss prevention flagged him for previous frauds at the store, Downey said.

As they were exiting the store police officers stopped the suspects and upon searching them and their silver Mercury Sedan, discovered stolen property including a credit card that was linked to 58-year-old woman from Pinole, Downey said.

They were identified as San Francisco residents Jessica Reed, going under the fake name Tiffany Marie Dunson, 31, and Dwayne Marcel Ross, 38. Both were both booked into the Santa Clara County Main Jail in San Jose.

Reed was arrested on alleged possession of stolen property, possession of paraphernalia, identity theft, possession of controlled substance and burglary.

Dunson was arrested on alleged attempted burglary, possession of stolen property, two counts of identity theft and one count of violating post release community supervision.

An investigation was ongoing as there may be multiple victims, Downey said.

(Copyright 2013 by CBS San Francisco and Bay City News Service. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

 2 Arrested On Identity Theft Charges In Palo Alto

Article source: http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2013/06/27/2-arrested-on-identity-theft-charges-in-palo-alto/

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Is multi-factor authentication the solution for identity theft?

Friday, June 28th, 2013

The need for identity theft prevention is obvious. Everyday, I receive spam messages that phish for passwords, attempt to have me login to a bank site, or try to get me to login to a fake PayPal site to reveal my password. It’s really annoying. There’s nothing more that I would like to do than to chase these people down and put them in jail. What would happen between capture and delivery to jail is almost unspeakable. I wouldn’t be nice. The pain, suffering, loss, and damage that these criminals cause is so great that we have to do something to stop it. Multi-factor authentication is the answer.

I deleted my Facebook account due to privacy concerns. I don’t like the fact that I have to worry about someone stealing my identity from some cheesy website. I don’t like feeling paranoid when I go to a bookstore and want to connect to their WiFi. And I really don’t like knowing that somewhere, someone spends their days trying to empty my bank account. These things really annoy me. They annoy me to the point of asking some authority to take action against them directly and indirectly.

Indirectly, we can use multi-factor authentication for password-protected websites and services. It’s necessary. It’s no longer an option not to have this capability. We don’t balk at using SSH to connect to a remote system or at using HTTPS to connect to a website. Why then should we hesitate in protecting everything with multi-factor authentication?

We shouldn’t.

I wouldn’t mind carrying around a RSA SecurID key fob on my key chain to ensure my privacy when I login to a website, make a purchase at a store, or connect to free WiFi.

You shouldn’t mind either.

I don’t want one for each site either. I want a single device to carry around that is a universal ID for me. And technology needs to catch up with criminal activity so that if your key fob is lost or stolen, the device gets disabled remotely—kind of like a remote wipe for a lost or stolen phone, tablet, or laptop because secure tokens aren’t perfect either.

The device should also have a locator service too, like your cell phone and tablet does. 

Identity theft criminals need to find legitimate jobs.

I don’t take any kind of criminal activity lightly but cyber criminals are an especially dirty lot. Wouldn’t their time be better spent in the light of day, on a real job, being productive, worthy, and happy? Some will counter with, “It’s an economic problem.” I’m not buying that. In my humble opinion, if these people weren’t involved in a cyber scam, they’d be involved in some other criminal activity and it has nothing to do with economy.

It has to do with trying to get someone else to fund your extreme lifestyle without working a legitimate job. It’s selfish and criminal behavior.

Multi-factor authentication will stop a lot of identity theft that’s associated with stealing passwords.

There are other types of multi-factor authentication that don’t involve one-time passwords using a random number key fob device.

There are biometric schemes, random multiple question authentication, and services such as OpenID that allow you to more securely connect to sites and services with less chance of a stolen ID.

I also think that sites and services should deny access after three bad passwords or authentication attempts. This will ensure that criminals can’t use dictionary and brute force attacks against a login screen to get your identity. Unless your password is extremely simple, this would discourage such attacks. Password complexity can also be enforced.

The problem with passwords is that the simple ones can be guessed, attacked with dictionaries, or brute force guessed. Complexity helps some but it also causes people to write down passwords or to use something simple. Even worse, the same password can be used on every site. These weaknesses make multi-factor authentication a ‘must.’

In fact, I’m drawing  a line in the sand today. I’ll give the sites I use one year from July 1, 2013 to implement multi-factor authentication or I’ll stop using the site or service. Sites such as Twitter, Facebook, other social networking sites, banks, PayPal, Ebay, Gmail, etc. all need to setup some sort of secure login in the form of multi-factor authentication.

It’s really no longer an option not to have it.

How many identities, credit card numbers, and passwords have to be compromised before we take action?

One year.

Setup some way to identify me as me or I’ll stop using the site. If we all take this stand, we’ll be taking a stand for a safer Internet and a stronger stance against cybercriminals.

Multi-factor authentication will decrease the number of identity thefts. There’s no perfect way to thwart criminals because they spend their time trying not to make an honest living. You have to spend yours making sure that they receive diminishing returns for their efforts.

What do you think the solution is for identity theft? Do you have a better idea than multi-factor authentication? Talk back and let me know.

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/is-multi-factor-authentication-the-solution-for-identity-theft-7000017340/

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Is multi-factor authentication the solution for identity theft?

Friday, June 28th, 2013

The need for identity theft prevention is obvious. Everyday, I receive spam messages that phish for passwords, attempt to have me login to a bank site, or try to get me to login to a fake PayPal site to reveal my password. It’s really annoying. There’s nothing more that I would like to do than to chase these people down and put them in jail. What would happen between capture and delivery to jail is almost unspeakable. I wouldn’t be nice. The pain, suffering, loss, and damage that these criminals cause is so great that we have to do something to stop it. Multi-factor authentication is the answer.

I deleted my Facebook account due to privacy concerns. I don’t like the fact that I have to worry about someone stealing my identity from some cheesy website. I don’t like feeling paranoid when I go to a bookstore and want to connect to their WiFi. And I really don’t like knowing that somewhere, someone spends their days trying to empty my bank account. These things really annoy me. They annoy me to the point of asking some authority to take action against them directly and indirectly.

Indirectly, we can use multi-factor authentication for password-protected websites and services. It’s necessary. It’s no longer an option not to have this capability. We don’t balk at using SSH to connect to a remote system or at using HTTPS to connect to a website. Why then should we hesitate in protecting everything with multi-factor authentication?

We shouldn’t.

I wouldn’t mind carrying around a RSA SecurID key fob on my key chain to ensure my privacy when I login to a website, make a purchase at a store, or connect to free WiFi.

You shouldn’t mind either.

I don’t want one for each site either. I want a single device to carry around that is a universal ID for me. And technology needs to catch up with criminal activity so that if your key fob is lost or stolen, the device gets disabled remotely—kind of like a remote wipe for a lost or stolen phone, tablet, or laptop because secure tokens aren’t perfect either.

The device should also have a locator service too, like your cell phone and tablet does. 

Identity theft criminals need to find legitimate jobs.

I don’t take any kind of criminal activity lightly but cyber criminals are an especially dirty lot. Wouldn’t their time be better spent in the light of day, on a real job, being productive, worthy, and happy? Some will counter with, “It’s an economic problem.” I’m not buying that. In my humble opinion, if these people weren’t involved in a cyber scam, they’d be involved in some other criminal activity and it has nothing to do with economy.

It has to do with trying to get someone else to fund your extreme lifestyle without working a legitimate job. It’s selfish and criminal behavior.

Multi-factor authentication will stop a lot of identity theft that’s associated with stealing passwords.

There are other types of multi-factor authentication that don’t involve one-time passwords using a random number key fob device.

There are biometric schemes, random multiple question authentication, and services such as OpenID that allow you to more securely connect to sites and services with less chance of a stolen ID.

I also think that sites and services should deny access after three bad passwords or authentication attempts. This will ensure that criminals can’t use dictionary and brute force attacks against a login screen to get your identity. Unless your password is extremely simple, this would discourage such attacks. Password complexity can also be enforced.

The problem with passwords is that the simple ones can be guessed, attacked with dictionaries, or brute force guessed. Complexity helps some but it also causes people to write down passwords or to use something simple. Even worse, the same password can be used on every site. These weaknesses make multi-factor authentication a ‘must.’

In fact, I’m drawing  a line in the sand today. I’ll give the sites I use one year from July 1, 2013 to implement multi-factor authentication or I’ll stop using the site or service. Sites such as Twitter, Facebook, other social networking sites, banks, PayPal, Ebay, Gmail, etc. all need to setup some sort of secure login in the form of multi-factor authentication.

It’s really no longer an option not to have it.

How many identities, credit card numbers, and passwords have to be compromised before we take action?

One year.

Setup some way to identify me as me or I’ll stop using the site. If we all take this stand, we’ll be taking a stand for a safer Internet and a stronger stance against cybercriminals.

Multi-factor authentication will decrease the number of identity thefts. There’s no perfect way to thwart criminals because they spend their time trying not to make an honest living. You have to spend yours making sure that they receive diminishing returns for their efforts.

What do you think the solution is for identity theft? Do you have a better idea than multi-factor authentication? Talk back and let me know.

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/is-multi-factor-authentication-the-solution-for-identity-theft-7000017340/

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IDentity Theft 911 Releases Best Practice Guide to Managing Cyber Lawsuits in …

Thursday, June 27th, 2013
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Scottsdale, AZ (PRWEB) June 27, 2013

IDentity Theft 911 today released a whitepaper designed to help personal lines insurance carriers tackle the issue of lawsuits stemming from electronic aggression, like cyberbullying. Titled “Minor Electronic Acts Liability Guide: A Best Practice Guide to Managing Electronic Aggression Exposure in Personal Lines”, the whitepaper explains minor electronic acts liability and offers three options for providing coverage: a restricted policy, a semi-restricted policy, and a non-restricted policy.

Concerned for their children’s welfare, parents of cyberbullying victims are seeking recourse through the courts. As a result, such lawsuits led to verdicts with awards totaling $87 million in 2012, and all signs indicate that legal activity will only escalate. When parents are held liable for their children’s cyber wrongdoings, the first place they look to see if they’re covered is their homeowners’ insurance policy and/or umbrella policy. Insurance companies are left asking themselves if their policies are built to withstand a claim from a homeowner who has been sued for electronic aggression.

Personal lines insurers are left with determining how, or if they want to cover, personal injury claims related to the use of electronic media, like social networking sites, email, blogs, and other digital forums. Depending on the coverages purchased or the policy language in place, parents could be left unprotected in the event a minor in their household is accused of cyberbullying.

“From 2003 to 2007, the proliferation of social networks has increased the number of known defamation lawsuits by electronic means by nearly 800 percent,” said Matt Cullina, CEO, IDentity Theft 911. “Personal lines insurance carriers must tackle this issue head-on and ask themselves if their policies are built to withstand a claim from a homeowner who has been sued for digital misconduct. We designed this whitepaper as an easy-to-read reference guide for insurance carriers to determine which coverage options are the best fit for them and their policyholders.”

To download the whitepaper or listen to the pre-recorded webinar explaining the whitepaper, please visit http://www.idt911.com/cyberbullying.aspx.

About IDentity Theft 911®

Founded in 2003, IDentity Theft 911 is the nation’s premier consultative provider of identity and data risk management, resolution and education services. The company serves 17.5 million households across the country and provides fraud solutions for a range of organizations, including Fortune 500 companies, the country’s largest insurance companies, corporate benefit providers, banks and credit unions and membership organizations. In addition, the company provides preventative and breach response services to more than 600,000 businesses. IDentity Theft 911 is the proud recipient of several awards, including the Stevie Award for Sales and Customer Service and the Parent Tested, Parent Approved award for social networking monitoring tool SocialScout. For more information, please visit http://www.idt911.com, http://www.facebook.com/idt911 and http://www.twitter.com/idt911.

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Article source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/6/prweb10877281.htm

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